AC current levels

AC current levels

0.25mA  Maximum Leakage Current for Class II equipment in IEC 950 (Information Technology Equipment, I.T.E.) (no protective earth ground in the equipment, double insulation or reinforced insulation)

0.5mA Earth Leakage Current limit in IEC 601-1 (Medical Equipment) (this is general value, here are also other leakage current requirements in IEC 601-1)

0.5mA Perception level, tingling sensation,Perception level, tingling sensation

0.51mA UL limit used by UL for continuous 60-Hz sinusoidal current: Involuntary muscular reaction

0.75mA  Maximum Leakage Current for Class I (Hand held) equipment in IEC 950 (Information Technology Equipment, I.T.E.) (basic insulation and protective earth ground connect to case)

1mA A person can feel at least 1 mA (rms) of AC at 60 Hz

1mA Current of less than 1 mA (AC or DC) can cause fibrillation if the current has a direct pathway to the heart (e.g., via a cardiac catheter or other kind of electrode)

3.5mA  Maximum Leakage Current for Class I equipment in IEC 950 (Information Technology Equipment, I.T.E.) (basic insulation and protective earth ground connect to case)

5mA Typical GFCI limit in USA. Electric current below 5 mA is not considered dangerous.

5mA UL limit used by UL for continuous 60-Hz sinusoidal current: Involuntary muscular reaction

9mA The value of current considered dangerous was obtained experimentally, and is usually given as approximately 9 mA.

10mA Painful shock, freezing current, “can’t let go” (tetanized muscle)

10mA Residual current detector limit in use in Europe for sensitive RCDs.

20mA UL limit used by UL for continuous 60-Hz sinusoidal current: Ventricular fibrillation

30mA Typical residual current detector limit widely in use in Europe

35mA Heart rhythm affected (Ventricular fibrillation), death may occur

50mA Electric current above 50 mA is considered fatal in USA and Canada electrical safety regulations.

60mA  50 or 60 Hz AC current through the chest for a fraction of a second may induce ventricular fibrillation at currents as low as 60 mA.

100mA When 100mA is flowing through the body for only two seconds can cause death

200mA Above 200 mA, muscle contractions are so strong that the heart muscles cannot move at all.

1A Commonly used nominal output current for current transformers used for electrical power measurements in electrical power panels and distribution systems

2.5A Maximum allowed current for equipment that use “Europlug” (EN 50075) mains connector

5A Commonly used nominal output current for current transformers used for electrical power measurements in electrical power panels and distribution systems

6A Mains power fuse size (found on some old installations in Europe)

10A Commonly used mains outlet fuse size found in Europe (1.5 mm^2 wiring)

13A Maximum current available from electrical outlets in UK (maximum fuse size in fused plugs)

15A Commonly used mains outlet fuse size used in USA

16A Commonly used mains outlet fuse size found in Europe (2.5 mm^2 wiring)
16A Standard CEEFORM mains connector current rating (CEE 17 7 IEC 309)

20A Mains outlet fuse size used in USA for outlets (heavy loads)

25A Commonly used fuse size for incoming wire in mains distribution panels for small houses in Finland (three phase 400/230V power at 25A per phase)

32A Standard CEEFORM mains connector current rating (CEE 17 7 IEC 309)

63A Standard CEEFORM mains connector current rating (CEE 17 7 IEC 309)

125A Standard CEEFORM mains connector current rating (CEE 17 7 IEC 309)

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