LED suit snowboarder

Nowness is an interesting looking footage called Jacob Sutton’s L.E.D. Surfer. It shows a pro snowboarder in an LED light suit, gliding through snow in the dead of night. At first sight, I thought this was just a normal snowboarding short with the color inverted, but it really is a man boarding through the night covered with light.

Very nice looking higher resolution version of video can be viewed Nowness web page.

Man surfs slopes at night in LED suit and Jacob Sutton’s L.E.D. Surfer articles gives you some details of the technology used to make the video. The sole source of lighting in the video was the snowboarder’s LED suit (custom made LED jacket pants setup made by John Spatcher). According to video description fashion photographer Jacob Sutton spent three nights on a skidoo with his trusty Red Epic camera (pretty amazing camera specifications including 14 megapixel high speed video shooting) at temperatures of -25C to snap pro snowboarder William Hughes carving effortlessly through the deep snow for this . The entire project was commissioned by Nowness – an online platform that documents stories in the luxury world of art, culture, design, fashion, food, film, and more.

5 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:
    Story behind “Glow Man” aka “L.E.D. Surfer”
    http://espn.go.com/action/snowboarding/story/_/id/7682997/the-story-jacob-sutton-led-surfer-glow-man-snowboard-film?cid=EM_EDNMicro

    Behind the scenes of the viral video sensation that was shot at the home of Winter X Games Tignes

    The official title of Sutton’s video is actually “Glowing Man” but it has been re-dubbed by the masses as L.E.D. Surfer. The film comes from an entirely different filmic language from snowboarding’s usual core offerings: The London-based Sutton, 33, is best known for his photo work in the fashion world with distinguished clients such as Hermès and Burberry. He is also on the forefront of the recent boom in fashion films, shooting for the likes of H+M, Comme des Garçons, and The New York Times.

    (Gear nerds: The team shot the nuanced night action with Red Epic cameras, known for their high frame rate and large capture.)

    The light suit was designed by John Spatcher, who put over 300 man-hours into getting it right, and its restrictive nature meant that Hughes had to get an assistant to fasten his boots and bindings. The hood also meant that goggles wouldn’t work so Hughes had to ride without, in temps plummeting to -25 C (-13F). Ouch.

    “It contained about 5000 LEDs [Ed. light-emitting diodes] in the end and was powered by two battery cells on Will’s chest,” explains Sutton. “Because of the complexity of the electronics involved and the fact that it was -25C and the suit was getting quite a thrashing, it was inevitable that things went wrong…

    Sutton is suitably humbled and energized by the overwhelming reaction: “The response to the film has been amazing.”

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:
    Function, drama, and whimsy—the many faces of LEDs
    http://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs/led-zone/4390999/Function–drama–and-whimsy-the-many-faces-of-LEDs?cid=EDNToday

    Having just taken over the LED beat on EDN, I’m impressed with the fantastic use of LED technology to not only add functionality and energy-efficiency to a myriad of designs, but also as a creative expression.

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:
    LEDs score gold at Olympics
    http://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs/led-zone/4391380/LEDs-score-gold-at-Olympics?cid=Newsletter+-+EDN+on+Systems+Design

    LEDs are lighting up the Olympics. GE, for example, has exceeded $1 billion in infrastructure sales over the past four Olympic games.

    London’s Tower Bridge: GE, EDF, the Mayor of London and City of London Corporation refitted London’s Tower Bridge with an energy-efficient LED lighting system, expected to be in place for the next 25 years.

    Did you see the dove bikes at the opening ceremony? Yep—the fabric wings had tiny LED lights

    Olympic Park, which includes Olympic Stadium, the Velodrome and Aquatics Center: GE Lighting supplied 25,000 Tetra PowerMAX LED modules as well as Tetra LED Drivers to light the park at night. Currently, for the games, the light levels will be 15 or 30 lux, which will be dimmed to 15, 5 or 2 lux once the Olympics are over.

    The RGB LED system was manufactured by Philips Color Kinetics and supplied by UK-based distributor Architainment. In total there are 11,193 channels of individual control, using hard-wired Ethernet and Wi-Fi.

    One of the coolest—pun intended—LED light use, was LED-lit seats. Olympic viewers watched as waves of lights flowed with the beat of the music.

    Naturally there are LED-based hats, wands, and you-name-it gizmos that are part of the Olympics fare.

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:
    LED Snowboards Light Up The Night
    http://hackaday.com/2014/05/17/led-snowboards-light-up-the-night/

    Snowboarding at night is awesome — but unless your riding on a well-lit ski slope you’re not going to have much luck free-styling through the mountains — unless of course you’ve got a board equipped with floodlights!

    The folks over at Signal Snowboards do tons of cool snowboard mods

    they decided to make the Floodlight Snowboard, a board equipped with LED lights on all sides that makes for amazing nighttime riding — and really cool video and photo effects!

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*