Art of Photographing at Olympics and Zero-G

Here are links to some interesting articles on professional photography.

The Inside Story of How Olympic Photographers Get Such Stunning Images article tells how the AP and Getty Images, two of the biggest photo agencies on the scene, get their incredible photos from the Olympics to the United States. Digital photography has completely changed the way the Olympics are shot: It is possible that in less than three minutes after a major sports event the processed photo is available on servers all over the world. It’s really important to get images out almost as quickly as you would see them on TV. Read the article to learn about technologies and processes they use. The key technologies are Canon and Nikon cameras that shoot high quality JPEGs that are transported from camera to editing office through Ethernet cable.

Another photography related article is All of Art & Science Has Culminated in Kate Upton’s Zero-G Bikini Shoot, that tells that Sports Illustrated had idea to shoot supermodel Kate Upton in Zero Gravity Corporation flight to model new bikini for Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2014 issue.┬áScience and art of photography meets as ZERO-G passengers experience weightlessness as pilots flying the company’s modified Boeing 727 fly in parabolic arcs. There are videos on photo shoot available at All of Art & Science Has Culminated in Kate Upton’s Zero-G Bikini Shoot and Kate Upton Goes Zero-G for Sports Illustrated’s 2014 Swimsuit Issue articles. Upton isn’t the only celebrity to fly in ZERO-G’s unique brand of weightlessness: Check also Fun in Zero-G: Weightless Photos from Earth and Space gallery for more zero gravity shots.

 

 

 

 

3 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    The Future of Sports Photography: Drones
    They’re already at the Olympics. Soon, they’ll be at the football stadium.
    http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/02/the-future-of-sports-photography-drones/283896/

    Drones are being used to film ski and snowboarding events at the Winter Olympics in Sochi, as you may have noticed. But the use of unmanned aerial vehicles for sports photography is far from a passing gimmick. In fact, you should expect more and more athletic events to be filmed by drone.

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Sochi Drones Are Shooting the Olympics, Not Terrorists
    http://tech.slashdot.org/story/14/02/21/0334242/sochi-drones-are-shooting-the-olympics-not-terrorists

    “Rachel Feltman reports that drones are being used to film ski and snowboarding events at the Winter Olympics in Sochi”

    Sochi drone shooting Olympic TV, not terrorists
    http://news.yahoo.com/sochi-drone-shooting-olympic-tv-not-terrorists-152517775.html

    That drone you might have spotted hovering and zipping around the Sochi Olympic slopes isn’t searching for terrorists or protesters hiding behind the fir trees.

    It’s being used to transmit live video of snowboard and ski jump competitions to a screen near you.

    Q: Why use a drone to film Olympic events?

    A: “We can go really, really close. And we are really quiet, so nobody is distracted,” said pilot and cameraman Remo Masina, who has used drones to film skiers in Switzerland for commercials.

    And it’s cheaper than a camera crew on a helicopter.

    Q: Couldn’t a drone crash onto the crowd?

    A: It could, but so could a much heavier helicopter.

    Masina said chances of drone crashes are close to zero when a drone is handled by an experienced pilot, because the drones are programmed to return to base at the slightest problem

    Q: Could hackers divert a drone?

    A: It’s possible.
    But since the video drones are not armed, there’s a limit to the damage a hacker could do with them.

    Q: Are drones legal to fly?

    A: Local laws vary widely in terms of who can fly drones, where and for what purpose. Many countries impose restrictions for reasons of security and privacy, and so they won’t interfere with airplanes.

    The Future of Sports Photography: Drones
    They’re already at the Olympics. Soon, they’ll be at the football stadium.
    http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/02/the-future-of-sports-photography-drones/283896/

    Drones are being used to film ski and snowboarding events at the Winter Olympics in Sochi, as you may have noticed. But the use of unmanned aerial vehicles for sports photography is far from a passing gimmick. In fact, you should expect more and more athletic events to be filmed by drone.

    The drones are quieter and cheaper than a manned helicopter (though they can still cost up to $40,000), he told the Associated Press, and they allow the filmmaker to get much closer to his subject.

    Drones are also more flexible than cable-suspended camera systems, which are also present at the Winter Olympics.

    Reply

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