Circuit design software list

What is the best free or cheap electronics design software? It is hard to say in this ever changing field. I some time ago mentioned some software examples in Top Free Electronics Design Tools posting and you can find a long comparison list at Wikipedia Comparison of EDA software page.

For the circuit design I would say that this list from  Mostly free engineering software article is a good list of free/cheap software I can agree:

  • KiCad seems the best known open-source EDA system.
  • gEDA looks very similar.
  • EAGLE is a commercial package with a free version that will handle small double-sided boards.
  • DesignSpark PCB is not open-source, but looks very capable given the cost ($0). It is adware

From has done some playing with KiCad and gEDA (years ago) but I felt that they were lacking something in easy to use (some improvement needed here I think). From those alternatives EAGLE feels the best for me.

Here are also some new on-line focused alternatives:

CircuitBee is an online platform that promises to allow you to share live versions of your circuit schematics on your websites, blogs or forums that I covered three years ago.

Digi-Key Corporation and Aspen Labs launched two years ago one-of-a-kind online ‘Scheme-it’ tool for drawing schematics.

HackEDA is an interesting looking new on-line electronics design tool introduced last year. The premise is simple: most electronic projects are just electronic Lego: You connect your microcontroller to a sensor, add in a battery, throw in a few caps and resistors for good measure, and hopefully everything will work.

circuits.io was promising looking free circuit editor in your browser introduced two years ago. I has browser based schematic and board layout. Anyone familiar with Autodesk knows they have a bit of a habit of taking over the world. Autodesk started with 123D modeling tool that is suitable for designing models for 3D printing. Now Autodesk has followed with 123D Circuits: Autodesk’s free design tool. 123D is web-based software, and using it requires account creation on the circuits.io website. Anything you design sits on the cloud: you can collaborate with others and even embed your circuit (with functioning simulation). All your work is public unless you pay. There are many things similar to Fritzing in this.

CircuitMaker from Altium posting that tells that Altium recently announced CircuitMaker, their entry into the free/low-cost PCB design tool market. They’re entering a big industry, with the likes of Eagle, KiCad, gEDA, and a host of other tool suites. CircuitMaker from Altium posting has introductory video on CircuitMaker and discussion on it. CircuitMaker’s website is pushing the collaboration aspect of the software. The software is still in pre-beta phase.

EasyEDA is an integrated tool for schematic capture, circuit simulation and PCB layout that you use with your web browser. Read more about it from my posting on EasyEDA.

 

Related links: Check my postings on electronics design software.

 

107 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    New Online Thermal Design Tool
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_nBdIb24YE&feature=youtu.be

    Aavid Genie allows engineers to design heat sinks and run thermal simulations in minutes! Get thermal reports, drawings and CADs, engineering help, or request a quote in one click.

    https://www.aavid.com/aavid-genie

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Upverter Joins Altium
    http://hackaday.com/2017/08/28/upverter-joins-altium/

    In a post on the Upverter blog today, [Zak Homuth], founder of the online EDA suite Upverter has announced they have been acquired by Altium.

    The largest change in the announcement is the removal of Upverter’s paid professional tier of service. Now, the entirety of Upverter is free. Previously, this paid professional tier included CAM export, 3D preview, BOM management, and unlimited private projects for $1200 per seat per year.

    Upverter Joins Altium
    https://blog.upverter.com/2017/08/28/upverter-joins-altium/

    Introducing the future of electronic product design. And it’s free.

    I have some very exciting news: We’ve been acquired by Altium, a leading provider of design software for the electronics industry.

    Our mission at Upverter from the very start has been to make hardware and product design approachable for everyone: to make hardware less hard. To empower engineers, makers, hobbyists and students by equipping them with world-class technology through an intuitive user experience. We believe the best design tools fade into the background, freeing designers to be truly creative. And over the past seven years we’ve gotten really close to realizing this vision. We’ve built the world’s most sophisticated cloud-based, collaborative hardware design tool. We’ve helped more than 45,000 people design more than 80 thousand devices.

    But we’re not even close to finished yet.

    Altium shares our vision for a powerful, collaborative new style of product design software. Free, but powerful enough to design a real product, accessible-to-all, cloud-based and collaborative, and maybe, most importantly, incredibly intuitive, helpful even, and easy-to-use.

    You may have noticed that today we removed our paid professional account tier. From now on the best, most feature-full, most powerful version of Upverter will be our only version. It will always be free to use, for everyone, from anywhere. Regardless of whether you’re a professional electrical engineer, a maker, a student, a hobbyist or anyone else, you can now design your product, your hardware, your IOT device, your PCB – completely for free using Upverter. Unfettered access for all.

    I want to emphasize that we aren’t making Upverter free for the sake of free, and we aren’t making Upverter free because Altium doesn’t care about it. It’s exactly the the opposite. We believe that this new style of design platform is so valuable, and so necessary, that making it anything other than free would hurt the world

    Between Octopart, which provides free electronic component search and discovery (joined Altium in 2015) and our experiments with EEConcierge, which provides paid design services on-demand, inside your design tool (think of it as in-app purchases), we have come to the conclusion that indirect monetization is the future.

    The team that built Upverter: Steve, Mike, Francesca, Carmen, Ryan, Patryk, Yashwanth and me – the entire team – have joined Altium, and we’re continuing to work on Upverter in the hopes of making it so much better.

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    http://www.altium.com/company/investor-relations/investor-news/market-announcements

    Altium Expands Cloud-Based Offering with Acquisition of Upverter
    http://www.altium.com/resources/investor-announcement/altium_announces_upverter_acquisition_28_aug_2017.pdf

    Sydney, Australia – 28 August 2017 –
    Electronic design software com
    pany Altium Limited (ASX:ALU)
    announced today that it has acquired Upverter, Inc., t
    he developer of the world’s first fully-cloud, fully-
    collaborative electronics design system. Based in To
    ronto, Canada Upverter’s
    entire team of engineers,
    including its CEO and Co-Founder Zak Homuth, will join Altium.
    This transaction will augment Altium’s cloud-bas
    ed competencies and drive further differentiation and
    growth for Altium in the market for next-generation electronic CAD software

    “The acquisition of Upverter represents a significant step
    in the evolution of Altium’s
    cloud strategy to serve
    the needs of future electronic designers. Together,
    Altium and Upverter will leverage the power of
    traditional CAD systems with the lightness and intuitiv
    e qualities that are inherent to web-based solutions
    to form the foundation for a unified, end-to-end clo
    ud-based platform for the design and realization of
    electronic products,” said Alti
    um’s CEO, Aram Mirkazemi.

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Altium Acquires Upverter and EE Concierge
    https://www.eeweb.com/blog/max_maxfield/altium-acquires-upverter-and-ee-concierge

    A few minutes ago as I pen these words, I heard some tremendous news from Zak Homuth, CEO and Cofounder at Upverter.com — Zak informed me that the little rascals just got acquired by Altium.

    Ho hum. Another acquisition. Why should you care? Well, in fact this is of interest to a wide range of PCB designers, from hobbyists, makers, and students to grizzled old professional engineers.

    Although the core Upverter tools are very sophisticated, one of the most powerful and innovative capabilities is the EE Concierge feature. In addition to being embedded in the Upverter tools, this was also made available as an add-on for Eagle and Altium Designer (the team are currently working on making this add-on available in PCB design systems from Cadence and Mentor Graphics).

    What is EE Concierge? Well, imagine you are working on a design, but you are missing one or more parts. You could, of course, spend a few hours creating the symbol and footprint and capturing other data, but time is money and you’ve got better things to do. As an alternative, you can invoke EE Concierge and request that the part be created for you (there’s now a flat fee of $29 per part, irrespective of that part’s complexity).

    A crack team of EE Concierge engineers are standing by around the world.

    So, why is Altium’s acquisition of Upverter a win-win for all concerned — Altium, Upverter, and us users? Well, Upverter’s existing ~45,000 strong user base is an eclectic bunch that, as we’ve already mentioned, includes hobbyists, makers, and students. One thing these folks have in common is lack of money. Meanwhile, Altium has a massive userbase of professional engineers who can afford professional grade design tools, but who tend to be a bit older and more grizzled, as it were.

    Altium also owns the OctoPart search engine, which allows users to search across hundreds of distributors and thousands of manufacturers to track down the components they need for their design.

    Reply
  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    PCB123 Boasts a Native SnapEDA Interface
    https://www.eeweb.com/blog/max_maxfield/pcb123-boasts-a-native-snapeda-interface

    Since SnapEDA libraries are cloud-based, designers will get real-time access to any new symbols and footprints that are added to SnapEDA’s catalog.

    What does this mean? Well, PCB123 from Sunstone Circuits is a free, full-function PCB CAD tool, comprised of a schematic editor, physical layout editor, 3D mechanical previews, and BOM editor.

    Meanwhile, SnapEDA offers a parts library for circuit board design that can shave days off product development. All new models created by SnapEDA conform to the latest IPC standards (IPC-7351B) and are vetted with its patent-pending verification technology. Design content is available for millions of electronic components.

    With the release of PCB123 Version 5.6 and its native SnapEDA interface, designers can now search and download free, cloud-based symbols and footprints directly during design capture and layout, significantly boosting design productivity.

    Reply
  6. Tomi Engdahl says:

    PCB123 Boasts a Native SnapEDA Interface
    https://www.eeweb.com/blog/max_maxfield/pcb123-boasts-a-native-snapeda-interface

    Since SnapEDA libraries are cloud-based, designers will get real-time access to any new symbols and footprints that are added to SnapEDA’s catalog.

    Things are happening so quickly in PCB Design and Layout Space (where no one can hear you scream) that my head is spinning. For example, I just heard that the hot-off-the-press release of PCB123 boasts a native SnapEDA interface.

    Reply

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