Adobe Flash is finally dead

http://thenextweb.com/apps/2015/09/01/adobe-flash-just-took-another-step-towards-death-thanks-to-google/

Flash is duying technology being replaced with HTML5. And this development is for better for all.

Posted from WordPress for Android

3 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Frederic Lardinois / TechCrunch:
    Adobe says it will stop updating and distributing Flash at the end of 2020 — Adobe today announced that Flash, the once-ubiquitous plugin that allowed you to play your first Justin Bieber video on YouTube and Dolphin Olympics 2 on Kongregate, will be phased out by the end of 2020.

    Get ready to finally say goodbye to Flash — in 2020
    https://techcrunch.com/2017/07/25/get-ready-to-say-goodbye-to-flash-in-2020/

    Adobe today announced that Flash, the once-ubiquitous plugin that allowed you to play your first Justin Bieber video on YouTube and Dolphin Olympics 2 on Kongregate, will be phased out by the end of 2020. At that point, Adobe will stop updating and distributing Flash. Until then, Adobe will still partner with the likes of Apple, Mozilla, Microsoft and Google to offer security updates for Flash in their browsers and support new versions of them, but beyond that, Adobe will not offer any new Flash features.

    Adobe also notes that it plans to be more aggressive about ending support for Flash “in certain
    geographies where unlicensed and outdated versions of Flash Player are being distributed.”

    To some degree, today’s announcement doesn’t come as a major surprise. Given its wide distribution, Flash (and especially outdated versions of it) quickly became one of the main targets for hackers, and Flash offered them plenty of avenues for trying to get into their target’s machines. The fact that Apple never supported it on mobile (and Steve Job’s famous 2010 letter about that) only sped up Flash’s demise, especially as modern browsers and HTML5 allowed browser vendors to replicate Flash’s functionality without the need for third-party plugins. To be fair, Adobe probably wanted Flash do go away as much as everybody else and, by 2015, the company said as much. Since then, it has started to phase out Flash support from its applications and worked on providing its users with alternatives.

    Similarly, browser vendors have also started deprecating Flash support over the last few years. Google made Flash a “click-to-play” plugin, for example, that users must explicitly enable if they really want to use it. The same holds true for all other major browser vendors.

    At this point, there’s very little that Flash can do that HTML5 can’t handle.

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Adobe will kill Flash by 2020: No more updates, support, tears, pain…
    Buggy multimedia nightmare won’t see President Zuckerberg’s inauguration
    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/07/25/flash_nahuh_internets_screen_door_gone_for_good_by_2020/

    Adobe has officially set a kill date for its beleaguered Flash.

    The Photoshop giant said today it plans to end support for the hacker-prone multimedia browser plugin by the end of 2020. This means no more updates for Flash Player after that date and the end of support on many browsers, including Chrome, Internet Explorer and Edge, and Firefox.

    Facebook also says it will shut off Flash games by the end of 2020, and is advising developers to change their FB games over to a different format.

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Adobe announces the end of Flash
    https://www.neowin.net/news/adobe-announces-the-end-of-flash

    It’s finally happening. Long regarded as a miserable blight on the world wide web, Flash is going to the great tech graveyard in the sky – or perhaps to the depths of hell – and a date has been set for its demise.

    Today, Adobe announced that it is “planning to end-of-life Flash”, and said it will “stop updating and distributing the Flash Player at the end of 2020″. For now, Adobe remains “committed to supporting Flash through 2020″, and will continue to distribute security patches, maintaining OS and browser compatibility, and even adding new features and capabilities “where needed”.

    The company also said that it plans “to move more aggressively to [end-of-life] Flash in certain geographies where unlicensed and outdated versions of Flash Player are being distributed.”

    With the availability of newer web standards, such as HTML5 and WebGL, Flash has little reason to exist; major browsers have already begun phasing out their support, including Firefox, Chrome, and Microsoft Edge, which started blocking Flash content by default with the Windows 10 Creators Update.

    Reply

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