A Photon Has Been Sent To Space Using Quantum Teleportation | IFLScience

http://www.iflscience.com/physics/a-photon-has-been-sent-to-space-using-quantum-teleportation/

Last month, Chinese researchers showed that quantum communication between Earth and space is possible, and now they have used the tech to send a photon to space using quantum teleportation.
As this research shows, to create a truly global network for quantum communication, we will need quantum satellites.

4 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    First Object Teleported from Earth to Orbit
    https://www.technologyreview.com/s/608252/first-object-teleported-from-earth-to-orbit/

    Researchers in China have teleported a photon from the ground to a satellite orbiting more than 500 kilometers above.

    The rocket placed Micius in a Sun-synchronous orbit so that it passes over the same point on Earth at the same time each day.

    Micius is a highly sensitive photon receiver that can detect the quantum states of single photons fired from the ground. That’s important because it should allow scientists to test the technological building blocks for various quantum feats such as entanglement, cryptography, and teleportation.

    Today, the Micius team announced the results of its first experiments. The team created the first satellite-to-ground quantum network, in the process smashing the record for the longest distance over which entanglement has been measured. And they’ve used this quantum network to teleport the first object from the ground to orbit.

    Teleportation has become a standard operation in quantum optics labs around the world. The technique relies on the strange phenomenon of entanglement.

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Quantum Cryptography System Breaks Daylight Distance Record
    http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/aerospace/satellites/quantum-cryptography-in-daylight-across-53-kilometers

    Satellites can now set up quantum communications links through the air during the day instead of just at night, potentially helping a nigh-unhackable space-based quantum Internet to operate 24-7, a new study from Chinese scientists finds.

    Previously, “the maximum range for day-time free-space quantum communication was 10 kilometers,”

    Now researchers led by quantum physicist Jian-Wei Pan at the University of Science and Technology of China at Hefei have successfully established 53-kilometer quantum cryptography links during the day between two ground stations. This research suggests that such links could work between a satellite and either a ground station or another satellite, they say.

    To overcome interference from sunlight, the researchers switched from the roughly 700-to-900-nanometer wavelengths of light used in all prior day-time free-space experiments to roughly 1,550 nm. The sun is about one-fifth as bright at 1,550 nanometers as it is at 800 nanometers, and 1,550-nanometer light can also pass through Earth’s atmosphere with virtually no interference. Moreover, this wavelength is also currently widely used in telecommunications

    Now researchers led by quantum physicist Jian-Wei Pan at the University of Science and Technology of China at Hefei have successfully established 53-kilometer quantum cryptography links during the day between two ground stations. This research suggests that such links could work between a satellite and either a ground station or another satellite, they say.

    To overcome interference from sunlight, the researchers switched from the roughly 700-to-900-nanometer wavelengths of light used in all prior day-time free-space experiments to roughly 1,550 nm. The sun is about one-fifth as bright at 1,550 nanometers as it is at 800 nanometers, and 1,550-nanometer light can also pass through Earth’s atmosphere with virtually no interference. Moreover, this wavelength is also currently widely used in telecommunications, making it more compatible with existing networks.

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