Green Energy Will Overtake Fossil Fuels by 2020, Morgan Stanley Analyst States | Big Think

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According to leading global investment firm Morgan Stanley the continuous drop in costs and the benefits surrounding green energy make it a rapidly more appealing option than its carbon-emitting cousins. A top analyst at the firm says green energy will overtake fossil fuels by 2020. There was no clear answer what they ment by “overtake”, but I quess it is overtake in investments and not overtake in amount of power generated.

Numerous key markets have reached an inflection point where renewables will have become the cheapest form of new power generation by 2020.

In 2016, the price of solar panels dropped 30%. They’re expected to fall another 20% this year. Wind power runs around $30 per megawatt hour (MWh), while natural gas is about $40-$60/MWh.

There is needs for breakthrough is in storage. While peak energy use occurs in the early morning and evening hours, solar energy is best collected at midday, while wind energy is best gathered at night. 

The claim is that higher capacity batteries like Tesla’s Powerwall 2 are the answer so the storage market alone is expected to grow from $300 million to as much as $4 billion within the next three years.

3 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Energy and Environment

    We’ve been underestimating the solar industry’s momentum. That could be a big problem.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/08/25/weve-been-underestimating-the-solar-industrys-momentum-that-could-be-a-big-problem/

    Analysts have been underestimating the expansion of solar energy for nearly two decades, scientists report in a new study released Friday. And that could be a serious problem for the industry and, maybe, the planet.

    If policymakers believe solar is growing more slowly than it actually is, they may be less likely to prioritize the kinds of research and development that will help better integrate renewables onto the grid, such as improving battery storage technology. This could lead us to continue relying on more carbon-intensive energy sources.

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Power Company Kills Nuclear Plant, Plans $6 Billion In Solar, Battery Investment
    https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/17/09/03/0543221/power-company-kills-nuclear-plant-plans-6-billion-in-solar-battery-investment

    After being unable to complete the Levy County Nuclear Plant a few years ago, Duke energy abandoned it, leaving rate payers on the hook. Duke is now in the process of settling legal action as a result. As part of the settlement Duke will construct or acquire 700MW of solar capacity over four years in the western Florida area, construct 50MW of battery storage, undertake grid modernizations and install 530 electric car charging stations.

    Power company kills nuclear plant, plans $6 billion in solar, battery investment
    Duke Energy Florida is just the latest utility to walk away from nuclear.
    https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/08/florida-power-company-exchanging-nuclear-plans-for-solar-plans-cutting-rates/

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Solar Companies Are Scrambling to Find a Critical Raw Material
    https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/17/11/13/2059233/solar-companies-are-scrambling-to-find-a-critical-raw-material

    Prices of polysilicon, the main component of photovoltaic cells, spiked as much as 35 percent in the past four months after environmental regulators in China shut down several factories. That’s driving up production costs as panel prices continue to decline

    Solar Companies Are Scrambling to Find a Critical Raw Material
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-11-13/solar-companies-grapple-with-unexpected-shortage-of-key-material

    Solar manufacturers are being battered by higher costs and smaller margins after an unexpected shortage of a critical raw material.

    Prices of polysilicon, the main component of photovoltaic cells, spiked as much as 35 percent in the past four months after environmental regulators in China shut down several factories.

    That’s driving up production costs as panel prices continue to decline, and dragging down earnings for manufacturers in China, the world’s biggest supplier. Canadian Solar Inc. and Hanwha Q Cells Co. have already reported steep declines in profit, and other companies will probably be affected as well, including JA Solar Holdings Co., which reports results Wednesday, and JinkoSolar Holding Co., the biggest publicly traded panel producer.

    “There’s just not enough polysilicon in China,” said Carter Driscoll, an analyst who covers solar companies for FBR & Co. “If prices don’t come down, it will crush margins.”

    Reply

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