Morgan Stanley Predicts Market For Grid Storage Will Explode In Next 3 Years | CleanTechnica

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/08/16/morgan-stanley-predicts-market-grid-storage-will-explode-next-3-years/

A new report authored by Stephen Byrd, a utility and cleantech analyst at Morgan Stanley, and Adam Jonas, its auto analyst, shows that they are bullish on the market for grid storage products. “Demand for energy storage from the utility sector will grow more than the market anticipates by 2019–2020,” the pair says.
They predict the demand for grid-scale storage will increase from less than $300 million a year today to as much as $4 billion in the next 2–3 years because of the low price of wind and solar energytogether with the falling price of grid storage products.

12 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Researchers Look To Materials To Improve Micro-Grid Renewable Energy Storage
    Liquids, molten metal elements, salt water, and chemicals are being studied as sources for new batteries.
    http://www.electronicdesign.com/power/researchers-look-materials-improve-micro-grid-renewable-energy-storage?NL=ED-004&Issue=ED-004_20170817_ED-004_354&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_1_b&utm_rid=CPG05000002750211&utm_campaign=12523&utm_medium=email&elq2=ab7a9c76151f484083a0f25cf82a8356

    Researchers are hard at work looking to come up with a battery technology that meets the economic and consumer needs of a rapidly growing demand for renewable energy storage of the micro-grid. Energy would come from the sun, wind, batteries, and other sources. They’re examining promising results from batteries using liquid, molten metal elements, salt-water, iron flow, zinc, lithium-air, and other chemistries to satisfy the needs of the electrical grid

    A 2012 study in Nature Magazine found that the average American would only be willing to pay about $13 more each month to ensure that the entire electrical grid could allow the U.S. electrical supply to run on renewable battery energy. That means utilities must be able to provide grid-level energy storage that would cost them less than $100 per kW-hour. According to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, battery prices continue to rapidly fall.

    Presently, that rate is hundreds of $/kWh. According to many experts, it has to come down to under $100/kWh for batteries based on liquid, molten-metal, salt water, and other chemistries to be competitive in the market.

    That hasn’t stopped researchers for trying to achieve that price goal.

    Some success has been achieved getting renewable energy storage on the market.

    What’s Ahead?

    As more of the aforementioned efforts in battery experimentations make headway, it may take quite a while before the battery that powers consumer electronics items becomes a reality. Let’s face it, the venerable battery technology most of us are familiar with will not improve much more, resulting in a smaller size, greater energy densities, greater reliability, and, of course, at an acceptable cost. It’s all about greater knowledge and application of chemistry. And flow battery technology, which has been around for four decades, may be one answer.

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Can Supercapacitors Surpass Batteries for Energy Storage?
    http://www.electronicdesign.com/power/can-supercapacitors-surpass-batteries-energy-storage

    Advances in supercapacitors are delivering better-than-ever energy-storage options. In some cases, they can compete against more-popular batteries in a range of markets.

    A supercapacitor is a double-layer capacitor that has very high capacitance but low voltage limits. Supercapacitors store more energy than electrolytic capacitors and they are rated in farads (F).

    Supercapacitors have many advantages. For instance, they maintain a long cycle lifetime—they can be cycled hundreds of thousands times with minimal change in performance. A supercapacitor’s lifetime spans 10 to 20 years, and the capacity might reduce from 100% to 80% after 10 or so years. Thanks to their low equivalent series resistance (ESR), supercapacitors provide high power density and high load currents to achieve almost instant charge in seconds. Temperature performance is also strong, delivering energy in temperatures as low as –40°C.

    On the other hand, supercapacitors are offset by their low energy density. Thus, they can’t be used as a continuous power source. One cell has a typical voltage of 2.7 V; if higher voltage is needed, the cells must be connected in series.

    Supercapacitors are used in many power-management applications requiring many rapid charge/discharge cycles for short-term power needs.

    Different materials, such as various carbon materials, mixed-metal oxides, and conducting polymers, have been used for supercapacitor electrodes. Advances in carbon-based materials, namely graphene, increase the energy density to nearly the level of batteries.

    Though a single supercapacitor cell will provide 2.7 V, higher voltages can be achieved by connecting several supercapacitors in series. Just as with lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors in a stack might not have the same capacitance due to manufacturing or uneven aging. Strings of more than three capacitors require voltage balancing to ensure long operational life, preventing overvoltages by keeping the voltage on each cell as low as possible to achieve the needed total stack voltage.

    Engineers can choose from various devices designed specifically to manage the unique requirements of supercapacitor charge, depending on the application.

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Energy-storage options: abundant alternatives and tricky tradeoffs
    http://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs/power-points/4458735/Energy-storage-options–abundant-alternatives-and-tricky-tradeoffs?utm_content=bufferd8b0e&utm_medium=social&utm_source=plus.google.com&utm_campaign=buffer

    Even when the source is perceived to be “free” (of course, there is no such thing) due to use of energy harvesting, solar power, or wind generation, there are almost always two associated issues: storing unused excess energy, and transmission of that energy. While the generation gets much of the public’s attention, the other two factors in the triad are equally important. The technical realities and economics of renewable “green” sources change dramatically when you can’t store any unused energy for use during slack periods.

    Energy storage turns out to be an especially difficult problem as you scale up to larger and larger numbers, and is generally much more difficult than the transmission problem.

    The leading options for storage are batteries (usually lithium based), pumped hydropower, flywheels, and compressed air. Batteries have received a lot of attention, especially due offerings such as Tesla’s Powerwall system for residential backup. As in most things “engineering,” and even putting cost aside for now (which you can’t do in the real world), each option has some subtle tradeoffs in up-front effort, capacity, maintenance issues, and long-term attractiveness. For example, batteries may have a life of only five or 10 years, and that number is likely dependent on the usage cycling.

    while storage is certainly not an intractable problem, it’s difficult to solve while satisfying conflicting goals. Every aspect of the design (siting, installation, and long-term support) gets much more difficult as you scale up into the tens, hundreds, and perhaps even thousands of kWhr range. Any problems or mistakes tend to be large-scale, with no easy fixes

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    A 110 kWh Powerbucket
    https://hackaday.io/project/12296-a-110-kwh-powerbucket

    The lead-acid batteries of my off-grid solar system are dead. I will replace them by a 18650 batteries stack housed in a big wooden box.

    My PV system works fine, but the lead-acid batteries have proven to be the weakest part of the design by far. Efficient 18650 lithium ion batteries are available at affordable prices, so why not change now ?

    This new LiIon battery will replace the 8 heavy lead-acid batteries currently installed (500 Kg). Theses batteries are housed in a big battery box. See the battery box here: https://cdn.hackaday.io/images/3076021414333246017.jpg

    Once fully populated with LiIon elements, the Powerbucket will store 110 KWh of energy, enough to cover the needs of my house during 11 days. For comparison, a Tesla Model S 85D has a 85 KWh battery. The complete battery stack will be made of 11 strings of 15 X 70 = 11 550 cells.

    The first phase of this challenging project will be to design and build the first 10 KWh string made of 15 X 70 = 1050 cells. I will design the Battery Management System in DIY mode.

    Reply
  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Researchers Look To Materials To Improve Micro-Grid Renewable Energy Storage
    Liquids, molten metal elements, salt water, and chemicals are being studied as sources for new batteries.
    http://www.powerelectronics.com/power-management/researchers-look-materials-improve-micro-grid-renewable-energy-storage?NL=ED-003&Issue=ED-003_20170821_ED-003_809&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_1_b&utm_rid=CPG05000002750211&utm_campaign=12558&utm_medium=email&elq2=10c745d0a8244aadaf1f1b330b981bb7

    Researchers are hard at work looking to come up with a battery technology that meets the economic and consumer needs of a rapidly growing demand for renewable energy storage of the micro-grid. Energy would come from the sun, wind, batteries, and other sources. They’re examining promising results from batteries using liquid, molten metal elements, salt-water, iron flow, zinc, lithium-air, and other chemistries to satisfy the needs of the electrical grid, according to information from Grist (www.grist.org) and the U.S. Dept. of Energy (https://energy.gov/).

    High cost is a big problem, according to Eric Rohlfing, deputy director of technology for ARPA-E, a division of the Department of Energy that identifies and funds leading-edge R&D. Since it was established by former President Obama in 2009, ARPA-E has funded $85 million toward developing new batteries that can meet that goal.

    Reply
  6. Tomi Engdahl says:

    A 2012 study in Nature Magazine found that the average American would only be willing to pay about $13 more each month to ensure that the entire electrical grid could allow the U.S. electrical supply to run on renewable battery energy. That means utilities must be able to provide grid-level energy storage that would cost them less than $100 per kW-hour. According to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, battery prices continue to rapidly fall.

    Presently, that rate is hundreds of $/kWh. According to many experts, it has to come down to under $100/kWh for batteries based on liquid, molten-metal, salt water, and other chemistries to be competitive in the market.

    Source: http://www.powerelectronics.com/power-management/researchers-look-materials-improve-micro-grid-renewable-energy-storage?NL=ED-003&Issue=ED-003_20170821_ED-003_809&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_1_b&utm_rid=CPG05000002750211&utm_campaign=12558&utm_medium=email&elq2=10c745d0a8244aadaf1f1b330b981bb7

    Reply
  7. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Simple DIY Powerwall using $1 LG 18650 eBay Cells
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7V9XQ34chc

    DIY Power Wall – Terminals #4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sP3gJRVLii0

    Reply
  8. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Listen Up: Energy Storage is the Home Appliance of the Future
    http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2017/08/listen-up-energy-storage-is-the-home-appliance-of-the-future.html

    Twenty years ago, the problem with rooftop solar was that customers needed a large collection of lead acid batteries to store their daytime energy and use this energy at night. But simple net metering rules made it possible for the electric grid to function as a 100 percent efficient storage device. Unfortunately, utilities are doing everything they can to eliminate net metering so they can maximize their profits. So the compelling need for battery storage linked with rooftop solar has re-emerged.

    Reply
  9. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Ex-Sun Microsystems Tech Guru Backs Startup to Solve Next-Gen Battery Needs
    https://www.designnews.com/electronics-test/ex-sun-microsystems-tech-guru-backs-startup-solve-next-gen-battery-needs/153300393657377?ADTRK=UBM&elq_mid=875&elq_cid=876648

    Notable ex-Silicon Valley tech guru Bill Joy is backing the design of new battery technology that is aimed at solving the problem of next-generation energy storage once and for all with a polymer electrolyte material.

    Reply
  10. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Battery Management Module Hacked for Lithium-Iron Battery Bank
    https://hackaday.com/2017/09/14/battery-management-module-hacked-for-lithium-iron-battery-bank/

    In a departure from his usual repair and tear down fare, [Kerry Wong] has set out on a long-term project — building a whole-house battery bank. From the first look at the project, this will be one to watch.

    Most battery banks designed for an inverter with enough power to run household appliances rely on lead-acid batteries, although lithium-ion has certainly made some inroads. [Kerry] is looking to run a fairly small 1000-watt inverter, and his analysis led him to lithium-iron cells.

    Modifying a 4S 100A LiFePO4 BMS Module
    http://www.kerrywong.com/2017/09/10/modifying-a-4s-100a-lifepo4-bms-module/

    For those who are following my YouTube channel, you would know that I am in the process of building a high capacity battery bank. When this project is done, I plan to use it with a 12V inverter as my backup generator in the event of a power failure. For the battery bank, I used eighty 3.2V 5.5Ah 32650 lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) batteries. These are arranged into 4 groups in series and each group consists of 20 cells paralleled together forming a 12.6V 110Ah battery bank.

    Like lithium ion batteries, lithium iron phosphate batteries require proper battery management system (BMS) to protect cells from overcharged or over discharged and also to ensure voltages among the cells in series are properly balanced. For my project, I decided to use an inexpensive off-the-shelf LiFePO4 BMS module. Since I intended to use the battery bank for a maximum load of around 1kW, I would need a BMS that can handle at least 80A discharge current continuously. And to charge the 110Ah battery bank, the charging current the BMS module must be able to withstand should be at least 6A (at 20C rate).

    Reply

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