Hardware hacks

USB VGA adapter as RF transmitter

Hackaday article Spoofing Cell Networks with a USB to VGA Adapter tells that at OsmoDevCon [Steve Markgraf] released osmo-fl2k, a tool which allows transmit-only SDR through cheap USB 3.0 to VGA adapters based on the Fresco Logic FL2000 chip. Available through the usual overseas suppliers for as little has $5 USD. The claim is that these devices

uCameraCube – Hackster.io

https://www.hackster.io/delmans/ucameracube-c64263 Need for a custom camera module. Check out this intetesting looking project. uCameraCube is a parametric camera module build using OpenSCAD uCube library. It is build with Raspberry Pi and Raspberry Pi camera and comes in three versions, which vary in the type of optics used. Thin Lens version M12 Lens version T-Mount version

Ten Years of the LilyPad Arduino

https://blog.hackster.io/ten-years-of-the-lilypad-arduino-2f5a949f76d2  The LilyPad Arduino was designed for e-textiles and wearables projects. It along with an accompanying collection of power supplies, sensors, and actuators share unique design with large conductive sew tabs around the edges. These allow the boards to be sewn onto fabrics, and soft surfaces, using conductive thread to build working circuits. Essentially it’s a specially

Hard Disk As An Accidental Microphone

Your Hard Disk As An Accidental Microphone article tells that modern hard disks can sense sounds around them unintentionally.  [Alfredo Ortega] has uncovered in his talk at the EKO Party conference in Buenos Aires where he he demonstrates how a traditional spinning-rust computer hard disk interacts with vibration in its surroundings, and can either become

People Are Using Old Laptop Batteries to Build Their Own Versions of Tesla’s Powerwall

https://futurism.com/people-are-using-old-laptop-batteries-to-build-their-own-versions-of-teslas-powerwall/ Tesla’s Powerwall was intended to provide a convenient way for homeowners to store electricity for future use, such as when the power goes out. But with a $5,500 price tag, they haven’t been affordable for many consumers.  Some who had been interested in the tech, however, decided to try to make their own: constructed their own powerwalls by utilizing

Is your encrypted USB drive secure?

https://www.kaspersky.com/blog/encrypted-usb-drives-audit/17948/?utm_source=kasperskysocialchannel.com&utm_medium=Kaspersky+Lab+%28Employees%2C+USA%29&utm_campaign=kasperskysocialchannel.com How can you be sure the “secure” USB drive you’re using is really secure and the data you store on it can’t be extracted? That’s exactly the question Google’s security researchers Ellie Bursztein, Jean-Michel Picod, and Rémi Audebert addressed in their talk, “Attacking encrypted USB keys the hard(ware) way,” at the recent Black Hat

Arduino emulating an 8086 PC (a work in progress, but it’s working) – arduino

https://www.reddit.com/r/arduino/comments/6sdtxr/arduino_emulating_an_8086_pc_a_work_in_progress/ This looks amazing work in progress:  code to emulate the basics of a typical 1980′s PC (video card, disk controller, input, 8253 timer chip, 8259 interrupt controller, etc), wired up 1 MB of SRAM on the breadboard, and added a 2.8″ 320×240 LCD display. I embedded a public domain XT BIOS in the PROGMEM.