Spying

Mobile Forensics CEO Proposes Controversial Access Tech for Smartphones – IEEE Spectrum

http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/telecom/security/mobile-forensics-ceo-proposes-controversial-publicprivate-key-access-for-smartphones This article discusses different potential approaches how law enforcement could get access to encrypted phones when needed but still have some security left. Is that possible or practical? Does not look good.

Why aren’t Stingrays rendered ineffective by standard MITM defenses? – Information Security Stack Exchange

http://security.stackexchange.com/questions/117460/why-arent-stingrays-rendered-ineffective-by-standard-mitm-defenses There’s been a lot of reporting in the past few years about law enforcement agencies using IMSI catchers (also known as Stingrays after a popular brand of them) to intercept cellular communications. Stingrays and other IMSI-catchers violate the cell tower agreements by producing an illegal signal, pretending to be a cell tower.They control the

Who Has Your Back? Government Data Requests 2015 | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Who Has Your Back? 2015: Protecting Your Data From Government Requests report https://www.eff.org/who-has-your-back-government-data-requests-2015 We live digital lives—from the videos shared on social networks, to location-aware apps on mobile phones, to log-in data for connecting to our email, to our stored documents, to our search history. The personal, the profound, and even the absurd are all

5 Major Hospital Hacks: Horror Stories from the Cybersecurity Frontlines – IEEE Spectrum

5 Major Hospital Hacks: Horror Stories from the Cybersecurity Frontlines article tells that real-world war, combatants typically don’t attack hospitals. In the cyber realm, hackers have no such scruples. “We’re attacked about every 7 seconds, 24 hours a day” Many computers and medical devices in hospitals are running ancient operating systems that are full of security holes.

What ISPs Can See

What ISPs Can See: Clarifying the technical landscape of the broadband privacy debate https://www.teamupturn.com/reports/2016/what-isps-can-see Truly pervasive encryption on the Internet is still a long way off. The fraction of total Internet traffic that’s encrypted is a poor proxy for the privacy interests of a typical user. Even with HTTPS, ISPs can still see the domains