Windows

Microsoft Accidentally Provides Example of Dangers of Encryption ‘Back Doors’

Microsoft Accidentally Provides Example of Dangers of Encryption ‘Back Doors’ http://reason.com/blog/2016/08/10/microsoft-accidentally-provides-example This example again shows that encryption back doors are a bad idea. Security failures have created “golden keys” which unlock Windows devices protected by Secure Boot. Microsoft Secure Boot key debacle causes security panic http://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-secure-boot-key-debacle-causes-security-panic/ Microsoft has one particular boot policy (“golden key” debug)

Sandboxes Explained: How They’re Already Protecting You and How to Sandbox Any Program

http://www.howtogeek.com/169139/sandboxes-explained-how-theyre-already-protecting-you-and-how-to-sandbox-any-program/ Sandboxing is an important security technique that isolates programs, preventing malicious or malfunctioning programs from damaging or snooping on the rest of your computer. The software you use is already sandboxing much of the code you run every day. You can also create sandboxes of your own to test or analyze software in a

Ubuntu on Windows 10

Could Microsoft’s love for Linux be extending into Windows 10 territory? Microsoft to show Bash on Linux running on Windows 10 article says that newly leaked session title from Microsoft’s upcoming Build 2016 developer conference has us Microsoft watchers speculating that you’ll soon be able to run Ubuntu on Windows 10. Microsoft and Canonical partner