Earth Day Today: Over 95 Percent Of The World Is Breathing Unsafe Air | IFLScience

http://www.iflscience.com/environment/over-95-percent-of-the-world-is-breathing-unsafe-air/

Seven billion people, over 95 percent of the world’s population, are breathing air that contains unhealthy levels of pollution. 60 percent of the world is living in areas that don’t even meet the most basic standards of air quality.

The findings come from the State of Global Air 2018 (PDF), an annual assessment by the Health Effects Institute (HEI).

7 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    New research: Cervical deaths and atmospheres have a connection

    The recently published study in BMJ Open deals with the short-term changes in certain atmospheric concentrations and the unexplained sudden deaths of totally healthy babies.

    The study found a connection between cache fatalities and airborne particles (PM10) and nitrogen dioxide concentrations (NO2).

    Other atmospheric pollutants were not found to be relevant to the mortality of infants. The study found an increased risk of cache death for two days after exposure to elevated levels of nitrogen dioxide. Elevated without low particulate concentrations appear to increase the risk of sudden death for up to five days after exposure.

    Source: http://www.iltalehti.fi/terveysuutiset/201804232200896394_we.shtml

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  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Earth Day 2018: 6 gadgets to help you go green
    Go green this Earth Day (and every day) with these eco-friendly devices
    https://www.electronicproducts.com/Sustainable/Research/Earth_Day_2018_6_gadgets_to_help_you_go_green.aspx?utm_source=Aspencore&utm_medium=EDN

    The 48th celebration of Earth Day this month will be buzzing with talk of our impact on the environment and what we can do to live in harmony with it. If you want to show support for Mother Earth, don’t think you have to abandon your electronics, because there’s no shortage of eco-friendly technologies available.

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    To save itself, humanity needs carbon-capture tech by 2030, warn scientists
    https://www.electronicproducts.com/Sustainable/Research/To_save_itself_humanity_needs_carbon_capture_tech_by_2030_warn_scientists.aspx

    World’s first carbon-capture station brought online in Iceland last May. The CO2 market was worth $6 billion in 2015 and is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 3.7% through at least 2025.

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    100% renewable by 2050 — how close can we get? Very close, but it’s not cheap
    https://www.electronicproducts.com/Sustainable/Research/100_renewable_by_2050_how_close_can_we_get_Very_close_but_it_s_not_cheap.aspx

    Could all of the countries that supported the Paris agreement on climate change subsist on 100% renewable energy by 2050? According to the latest research out of Stanford University, it just might be possible. In a study published in Joule, Cell Press’s new peer-reviewed journal focused on advancements in sustainable energy, Mark Z. Jacobson, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford, posits that 139 countries could rely entirely on wind, water, and solar power by the midpoint of this century.

    In the study, Jacobson and 26 of his colleagues examine each country’s renewable energy resources and assess how many wind, water, and solar energy generators each nation would need to construct to be 80% renewable-energy-reliant by 2030 and 100% reliant by 2050. According to their estimates, only about 1% of the total available land and rooftop space would be needed to accomplish these goals. Countries with large open swathes of land, such as the United States and China, will have the easiest time making this transition, according to the study. Smaller countries with less undeveloped land area may need to build offshore solar paneling in neighboring bodies of water to meet the 100% threshold.

    Reply
  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Traffic pollution prevents children’s brains from reaching their full potential
    https://horizon-magazine.eu/article/traffic-pollution-prevents-children-s-brains-reaching-their-full-potential_en.html

    Traffic pollution in European cities can stall children’s brain development and stop them from reaching their full potential, according to a Spanish study that measured air pollution in 300 classrooms.

    Researchers involved in the BREATHE project found that the distance to the nearest road significantly influenced the levels of harmful invisible particles in classrooms and ultimately slowed brain growth in children.

    The harmful effects are due to tiny particles released from vehicles, especially diesel engines. The invisible flecks of carbon are so small that once you breathe them in, they can cross from the lung into the bloodstream and then travel to the brain.

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    Traffic pollution prevents children’s brains from reaching their full potential
    17 July 2017
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    High pollution is linked to slower growth in the region of the brain where decision-making, social behaviour and complex thinking are believed to happen. Image credit – ‘Automobile exhaust gas’ by Ruben de Rijcke is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
    Traffic pollution in European cities can stall children’s brain development and stop them from reaching their full potential, according to a Spanish study that measured air pollution in 300 classrooms.

    Researchers involved in the BREATHE project found that the distance to the nearest road significantly influenced the levels of harmful invisible particles in classrooms and ultimately slowed brain growth in children.

    The project, funded by the EU’s European Research Council, examined 3 000 children in 40 different schools across Barcelona and discovered that those that inhaled more air pollution performed worse on computer tests. The harmful effects are due to tiny particles released from vehicles, especially diesel engines. The invisible flecks of carbon are so small that once you breathe them in, they can cross from the lung into the bloodstream and then travel to the brain.

    ‘They stimulate immune cells and produce an inflammatory effect at various levels of the brain,’ explained Professor Jordi Sunyer, lead scientists on the BREATHE project and senior researcher at the Barcelona Institute for Global Health, Spain.

    Each student was tested four times, leading researchers to find that a high-pollution day before a test could even affect a child’s performance. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were even more susceptible to pollution particles.

    The tiny particles of carbon are often surrounded by heavy metals, hydrocarbons and other chemicals known to be bad for health, which are already linked to heart disease, lung cancer and stroke, as well as pre-term births and diabetes.

    Reply
  6. Tomi Engdahl says:

    China’s Xian chokes on smog specks ‘harder than steel’
    http://m.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/2148173/chinese-city-chokes-smog-specks-harder-steel

    Researchers in pollution-prone Xian test the properties of the city’s bad air but health specialists say the bigger concern is just how small the particles are

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