The 50th anniversary of ARPANET, the internet’s predecessor

https://www.fastcompany.com/90423457/50-years-ago-today-the-internet-was-born-in-room-3420

Here’s the story of the creation of ARPANET, the groundbreaking precursor to the internet—as told by the people who were there.

At the same time:

RIPE NIC: ‘In Five Weeks We’ll Run Out of IPv4 Internet Addresses’

https://m.slashdot.org/story/362674

The RIPE Network Coordination Centre (RIPE NCC), which manages regional distribution of internet addresses for the UK, Europe, Middle East and parts of Central Asia, has confirmed that their final reserve pool of Internet Protocol v4 (IPv4) addresses will completely run out in November 2019.

“Our advice to network operators is to take stock of their IP resources and to make sure their IPv6 plans are making progress.”

4 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    This doesn’t mean you won’t be able to get them anymore. Just means it’s harder and you’ll likely have to get what your ISP is able to give you from their allotment.

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    ARPANET establishes 1st computer-to-computer link, October 29, 1969
    https://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs/edn-moments/4399541/ARPANET-establishes-1st-computer-to-computer-link–October-29–1969?utm_content=buffer6d53c&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

    The first-ever computer-to-computer link was established on ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network), the precursor to the Internet, on October 29, 1969.

    Originally funded by ARPA (Advanced Research Projects Agency), now DARPA, within the United States Department of Defense, ARPANET was to be used for projects at universities and research laboratories in the US. The packet switching of the ARPANET was based on designs by British scientist Donald Davies and Lawrence Roberts of the Lincoln Laboratory.

    The first message on the ARPANET was sent by UCLA student programmer Charles S Kline at 10:30 pm on October 29, from the campus’ Boelter Hall to the Stanford Research Institute’s SDS 940 host computer.

    The message text was meant to be the word “login,” but only the L and O were transmitted before the system crashed.

    Reply

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