New level of automation with Ansible – RHD Blog

https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2017/06/07/new-level-of-automation-with-ansible/?sc_cid=7016000000127ECAAY

Ansible is a simple agent-less automation tool that has changed the world for the better. It has many use cases and wide adoption.
This article is going to demonstrate Ansible. The intention of this article is not to teach you the basics of Ansible, but to motivate you to learn it.

Shell has been the comfort zone of every single Linux sysadmin. This article claims that Ansible should become part of the comfort zone for automation beyond shell scripting. A claim I can agree to – I just started learning Ansible and I see place for it. 

14 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    How to install Ansible on your favorite Linux distribution
    http://linuxbsdos.com/2017/01/27/how-to-install-ansible-on-your-favorite-linux-distribution/

    Ansible is an open source, SSH-based configuration management, automation and deployment tool from Red Hat (via acquisition). It’s in the same market as Chef and Salt, but because it relies on SSH, something that’s already installed on your servers, it’s the easiest tool to use for managing and working on remote servers.

    This post shows how to install it on your favorite Linux distribution.

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Installation
    http://docs.ansible.com/ansible/intro_installation.html

    Ansible by default manages machines over the SSH protocol.

    Once Ansible is installed, it will not add a database, and there will be no daemons to start or keep running. You only need to install it on one machine (which could easily be a laptop) and it can manage an entire fleet of remote machines from that central point. When Ansible manages remote machines, it does not leave software installed or running on them, so there’s no real question about how to upgrade Ansible when moving to a new version.

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Kalify
    Automate your Penetration Testing toolchain.
    https://github.com/mattimustang/kalify

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    ANSIBLE – Need Orchestration 6
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXsHxrshhYQ

    Ansible is a very powerful open source automation language. What makes it unique from other management tools, is that it is also a deployment and orchestration tool.

    Reply
  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Installation and Configuration of Ansible Automation Tool for IT Management
    https://www.linuxhelp.com/installationconfiguration-of-ansible-automation-tool/

    It manages nodes over SSH or over PowerShell. Modules that are working over JSON and standard output can be programmed in any language. In Ansible the playbooks deploys, orchests and configures. Its format is YAML. It maps a group of hosts to a set of roles. This tutorial will teach you, how to install Ansible on RHEL/CentOS, Fedora, Ubuntu and Debian systems.

    Reply
  6. Tomi Engdahl says:

    How to use Ansible to manage PostgreSQL
    https://opensource.com/article/17/6/ansible-postgresql-operations?sc_cid=7016000000127ECAAY

    Ansible, an open source automation tool, can make complex configuration and management tasks in Postgres simple.

    Reply
  7. Tomi Engdahl says:

    LinchPin: A simplified cloud orchestration tool using Ansible
    https://opensource.com/article/17/6/linchpin

    Launched in late 2016, LinchPin now has a Python API and a growing community.

    LinchPin, a hybrid cloud orchestration tool using Ansible. Provisioning cloud resources has never been easier or faster. With the power of Ansible behind LinchPin, and a focus on simplicity, many cloud resources are available at users’ fingertips. In this article, I’ll introduce LinchPin and look at how the project has matured in the past 10 months.

    Reply
  8. Tomi Engdahl says:

    GETTING STARTED: WRITING YOUR FIRST PLAYBOOK
    https://www.ansible.com/blog/getting-started-writing-your-first-playbook?sc_cid=7016000000127ECAAY

    Welcome to another post in our Getting Started series. Keep reading to learn how to draft a Playbook that can be run in Ansible or Ansible Tower. You can also use it along with the Module Index and the other docs to build your own Playbooks later.

    What is a Playbook?

    Playbooks are esentially sets of instructions (plays) that you send to run on a single target or groups of targets (hosts). Think about the instructions you get for assembling an appliance or furniture. The manufacturer includes instructions so you can put the parts together in the correct order. When followed in order, the furniture looks like what was purchased.

    That’s basically how a Playbook works.

    Reply
  9. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Using Ansible for deploying serverless applications
    https://opensource.com/article/17/8/ansible-serverless-applications

    Serverless is another step in the direction of managed services and plays nice with Ansible’s agentless architecture.

    Ansible is designed as the simplest deployment tool that actually works. What that means is that it’s not a full programming language. You write YAML templates that define tasks and list whatever tasks you need to automate your job.

    Most people think of Ansible as a souped-up version of “SSH in a ‘for’ loop,” and that’s true for simple use cases. But really Ansible is about tasks, not about SSH. For a lot of use cases, we connect via SSH but also support things like Windows Remote Management (WinRM) for Windows machines, different protocols for network devices, and the HTTPS APIs that are the lingua franca of cloud services.

    In a cloud, Ansible can operate on two separate layers: the control plane and the on-instance resources. The control plane consists of everything not running on the OS. This includes setting up networks, spawning instances, provisioning higher-level services like Amazon’s S3 or DynamoDB, and everything else you need to keep your cloud infrastructure secure and serving customers.

    On-instance work is what you already know Ansible for: starting and stopping services, templating config files, installing packages, and everything else OS-related that you can do over SSH.

    Reply
  10. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Using Ansible for deploying serverless applications
    https://opensource.com/article/17/8/ansible-serverless-applications?sc_cid=7016000000127ECAAY

    Serverless is another step in the direction of managed services and plays nice with Ansible’s agentless architecture.

    Ansible is designed as the simplest deployment tool that actually works. What that means is that it’s not a full programming language. You write YAML templates that define tasks and list whatever tasks you need to automate your job.

    Most people think of Ansible as a souped-up version of “SSH in a ‘for’ loop,” and that’s true for simple use cases. But really Ansible is about tasks, not about SSH. For a lot of use cases, we connect via SSH but also support things like Windows Remote Management (WinRM) for Windows machines, different protocols for network devices, and the HTTPS APIs that are the lingua franca of cloud services.

    Reply
  11. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Using Ansible to modernize telcos’ infrastructure through automation.
    http://verticalindustriesblog.redhat.com/using-ansible-to-modernize-telcos-infrastructure-through-automation/?sc_cid=7016000000127ECAAY

    As telecommunications companies continue to modernize their networks and IT systems, they have to navigate the challenges that come with legacy systems, including legacy virtualized network functions (VNFs) that rely on local filesystem storage, single server implementations on which all the services run, and manually-intensive installations and upgrades. What telcos need are tools like Ansible, a general-purpose, open-source automation engine that automates software provisioning, configuration management, and application deployment.

    Earlier this month, at AnsibleFest 2017 in San Francisco, Red Hat added new products and updated existing ones that expand its automation portfolio. It added the ability to automate network management and updated Ansible Tower, which enables the automation of IT functions at enterprise scale, so it can now be used to automate the management of Arista, Cisco and Juniper networking software as well as instances of Open vSwitch and VyOS. Red Hat acquired the company behind Ansible in 2015, and today the technology is one of the world’s most popular open source IT automation technologies

    Reply
  12. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Getting Red Hat Insights playbooks into your Ansible Tower
    https://www.redhat.com/en/blog/getting-red-hat-insights-playbooks-your-ansible-tower?sc_cid=7016000000127ECAAY

    Red Hat Insights is a powerful tool in administration automation.
    “a Software as a Service (SaaS) offering that helps you proactively identify and resolve technical risks in your IT infrastructure before they negatively impact your whole environment.

    If you have Red Hat Ansible Tower you can configure your Red Hat Insights credential and add a project, as explained in Ansible Tower documentation

    You can integrate this with your Red Hat Insights in CloudForms by enabling embedded Red Hat Ansible in CloudForms.

    Reply

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