Very high power LED lamps

Here are highest power LED lamps I have seen, from Audio Visual 2017 fair. Huge LED lamps with 450W and 800W power.

8 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    DL7S Profile™
    https://www.robe.cz/dl7s-profile/

    The DL7S Profile is the first DL range fixture to receive a powerful new 800W version of the LED engine with seven colours for unprecedented smooth, stable and even colour mixing and a very high CRI.

    LIGHT SOURCE
    800 W 7 colours LED engine

    LIGHT OUTPUT
    8.590 lm

    Protocols: USITT DMX-512, RDM, ArtNet, MA Net, MA Net2, sACN

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  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    VD LED 450 CW DMX
    Luminaire: Followspot, LED, 450W, CW
    zoom 08°-19°, 5600K, DMX control
    http://www.spotlight.it/en/products/luminaires/vd-led-450-cw-dmx/

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  3. Andrew McDougall says:

    Looks like those would be fun to play around with! Those remind me of a recent install we did at a nightclub in Toronto.

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Home> Tools & Learning> Products> Product Brief
    Powerful LEDs reach 200 lm/W
    https://www.edn.com/electronics-products/other/4458914/Powerful-LEDs-reach-200-lm-W?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=edn&utm_campaign=products-tools

    Samsung has introduced two new white LED families in “chip-scale” packaging, at 1W & 5W power levels. The LM101B and LH231B packaging includes a TiO2 coating on the cavity wall, reflecting stray light back into the main beam.

    Efficacies range from 170 – 200 lm/W, and parts are available in a range of CRI and CCT ratings.

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  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    New Part Day: A fake Sun
    https://hackaday.com/2017/11/17/new-part-day-a-fake-sun/

    rameters of interest, total input power and conversion efficiency have been steadily increasing over the years. An efficacy of 120 lumens/watt is fairly common nowadays, and it may not be improbable to expect double this figure in the near future. Input power ratings have also steadily increased, with single LED units capable of 100 W or more becoming common.

    But the Chinese manufacturer Yuji seems to have hit the ball out of the park by introducing their BC-Series, 500 W, high CRI, high Power, COB LED. Single, 500 W COB LED’s are not new and have been available since a couple of years, but their emitting surface areas are quite large. For example, a typical eBay search throws up parts such as this one – 500 W, high Power LED, 60,000 lm, 6000-6500K. It has a large, square emitting area of 47.6 x 47.6 mm. By comparison, the Yuji BC-Series are 27 mm square, with an active emitting area only 19 mm in diameter. This small emitting area makes it easier to design efficient reflector and/or lens units for the LED.

    Luminous Flux is between 18,000 to 21,000 for a color temperature of 3200 K, and between 20,000 to 24,000 for the 5600 K type.

    At US $ 500 a pop, these eye blinders do not come cheap

    https://store.yujiintl.com/collections/frontpage/products/bc-series-high-cri-high-power-cob-led-5600k-bc270h-unit-1pcs

    Comments:

    Something tells me that the $500 retail price will clearly not likely remain that high for long. My bigger question though is how does cooling have to be handled when you put that much power in such a small surface area?

    The main problem with these high output LEDs is dealing with the heat density of the package. Although it may sound like it is a good thing to have a smaller-ish package the issue will be removing the heat generated by the LED in such a small surface area (heat dramatically impacts LED lifetimes). As an example, 5000 Lumen Cree COB Leds can generate temps of about 70C with a surface temp of 135C … and that is considered “normal”… I can only imagine what the temps are for a single 20000 Lumen COB LED would be… gulp…

    Now this is a step closer to relamping older digital projectors and rear projection TVs with LEDs. Bring the cost down under $100 and it’ll be worth it.

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  6. Tomi Engdahl says:

    How to Replace / Convert a Halogen Floodlight with an LED Chip
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=STNHmvcoD90

    how to convert the old Halogen Floodlight, which consumes a lot of current, into a Floodlight Led using the LED Lamp Chip 50w

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  7. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Mains Voltage LED (and how NOT to handle mains voltage!)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PklaByEQSZA

    Testing a mains voltage LED from China. This one is rated 220V and 20W. It really can be connected directly to AC mains with no LED driver. 30W and 50W versions are also available. In the listings it’s called “smart IC” or “integrated driver” or “driverless” COB LED.

    Reply

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