Reading the signs: 5G is coming | EDN

https://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs/5g-waves/4458951/Reading-the-signs–5G-is-coming?utm_content=buffer9759f&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

One in 10 communications companies claim to have deployed 5G technology already, according to a recent survey (see: With 5G technology, the time is now).

Some parts of the 5G standard are close to being finalized, but nothing has been ratified yet. 

Furthermore, many of the constituent technologies (e.g., mmWave RF, beamforming, MIMO, etc.) are either new or not commonly used. SDN and NFV are considered critical enablers of the heightened utility and expanded flexibility that will be hallmarks of 5G networks.

The industry has a learning curve to climb. The recent set of announcements can be considered an indicator that the industry is beginning to surge up that slope. 

310 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    http://www.etn.fi/index.php/13-news/8545-5g-datan-elinika-kutistuu-millisekunteihin

    Tulevat 5G-verkot muuttavat monta asiaa. Yksi muutos koskee generoitavan datan määrää ja sen elinikää. Monissa sovelluksissa datan elinikä jää millisekunneiksi. Sen jälkeen sillä ei ole mitään käyttöä.

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Verizon’s 5G Rollout Experiences Are a Mixed Bag So Far
    https://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/telecom/wireless/verizons-5g-rollout-experiences-a-mixed-bag-so-far

    Verizon’s rollout last week of its proprietary 5G home service was met with a fair amount of vociferous skepticism. While the criticisms had their fair share of cattiness, they seemed to center primarily around just how limited the service coverage was rather than the quality of the service, or whether it truly constituted a 5G network.

    On the question of coverage, it was certainly a limited rollout including just four cities: Sacramento, Los Angeles, Houston and Indianapolis. However, even within that limited number of cities, Verizon never made it known exactly how much coverage they would be offering. It became clear after the rollout that the coverage would be limited to a few restricted neighborhoods in these cities.

    While coverage limitations garnered most of the complaints, the design of the network was not beyond reproach. The limited rollout had all the earmarks of 5G: millimeter wave (mmWave) transmission and small cells. However, Verizon’s 5G home service was more or less a prototype and did not meet the industry standards for 5G set out in Release 15 of the 5G New Radio specifications, scheduled for rollout in 2019.

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Today marks the 35th anniversary of the launch of the first cellular network in the United States in Chicago. Watch 5G explaine

    Everything You Need to Know About 5G
    https://spectrum.ieee.org/video/telecom/wireless/everything-you-need-to-know-about-5g

    Millimeter waves, massive MIMO, full duplex, beamforming, and small cells are just a few of the technologies that could enable ultrafast 5G networks

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    U.S. lawmakers warn Canada to keep Huawei out of its 5G plans
    https://techcrunch.com/2018/10/12/huawei-5g-canada-warner-rubio-trudeau/?utm_source=tcfbpage&sr_share=facebook

    In a letter addressed to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Senators Mark Warner and Marco Rubio make a very public case that Canada should leave Chinese tech and telecom giant Huawei out of its plans to build a next-generation mobile network.

    Reply
  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    5G moves forward, one topology at a time
    https://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs/5g-waves/4461190/5G-moves-forward–one-topology-at-a-time?utm_source=Aspencore&utm_medium=EDN&utm_campaign=social

    5G continues to move forward, but will 2018 be the year we remember as the year 5G became a reality? Let’s take a look at what’s happened and what we can expect

    Current state
    With the first draft of the initial 5G specification, Release 15, released in December 2017, the 3GPP and its contributors continue to evolve the standard toward achieving the lofty goals initially set in 2015. Release 15 focused on the non-standalone (NSA) modes and specifically the Option 3 configurations. In June, the 3GPP finalized the first standalone (SA) topology utilizing a new next generation core network (NGC).

    Although different, the SA and NSA topologies provide service operators with several options for 5G network deployment. NSA relies on the existing evolved packet core (EPC) or LTE network infrastructure to cost effectively transition to 5G services in a shorter timeframe.

    In December 2018, the 3GPP will complete NSA by defining two additional configurations – Option 4 and Option 7. These configurations take advantage of NGC but enable connectivity for existing LTE eNodeBs (ie legacy equipment). These configurations ensure that LTE may indeed have a longer life than prior standards and may be complementary to the 5G capabilities delivered in Release 15. The 3GPP continues to evolve LTE with goals of enhancing IoT capabilities along with V2X.

    Reply
  6. Tomi Engdahl says:

    The first real 5G phone is coming soon, well before 5G networks go live
    https://bgr.com/2018/10/16/xiaomi-mi-mix-3-release-date-worlds-first-5g-phone-is-coming-soon/

    and there’s also this silliness on top of everything. None of these phones feature 5G support, but the first real 5G phone is also dropping this month, even though you won’t be able to use 5G networks for quite some time.

    Reply
  7. Tomi Engdahl says:

    https://5g.co.uk/news/5g-britain-modelled-on-bournemouth/4120/

    The coastal town of Bournemouth has been chosen to trial a new kind of precise digital modelling that will be crucial to building a 5G-enabled Britain.

    Reply
  8. Tomi Engdahl says:

    5G moves forward, one topology at a time
    https://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs/5g-waves/4461190/5G-moves-forward–one-topology-at-a-time?utm_source=Aspencore&utm_medium=EDN&utm_campaign=social

    5G continues to move forward, but will 2018 be the year we remember as the year 5G became a reality? Let’s take a look at what’s happened and what we can expect.

    With the first draft of the initial 5G specification, Release 15, released in December 2017, the 3GPP and its contributors continue to evolve the standard toward achieving the lofty goals initially set in 2015. Release 15 focused on the non-standalone (NSA) modes

    In June, the 3GPP finalized the first standalone (SA) topology utilizing a new next generation core network (NGC).

    What’s next?
    Currently, infrastructure vendors around the world are conducting field trials with new 5G equipment and they’re measuring the results. The operators conduct these trials to test interoperability of equipment, evaluate the performance of the various options, and gather vital data necessary for network planning. These initial trials are focused on NSA modes including sub 6 GHz and mmWave equipment. Early indications reveal a focus on sub 6 GHz, NSA deployments (Option 3/3a/3x), and a migration to mmWave in 2019.

    Reply

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