Telecom and Networking

New Tech Secures Medical Devices By Using Your Body as a Conduit for Communication

https://blog.hackster.io/new-tech-secures-medical-devices-by-using-your-body-as-a-conduit-for-communication-8ca7b8128f67 The article says: “Virtually all wearable devices today communicate wirelessly through either Bluetooth, WiFi, or simple RF (Radio Frequency) signals. While we could try to make those more secure, there is always the possibility that they could be intercepted or spoofed. This new technology avoids the problem altogether by allowing devices to communicate across

Open-source communities fight over telco market | TechCrunch

https://techcrunch.com/2019/02/27/open-source-communities-fight-over-telco-market/ The Linux Foundation (LF) had its own booth at MWC. The booth is shared by the three LF projects: the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), Hyperleger and Linux Foundation Networking, the home of many of the foundational projects like ONAP and the Open Platform for NFV(OPNFV) that power many a modern network. With the

Networking trends 2019

5G? IoT? Fiber Deep? 600G? We Are ready for networking at 2019! For years we have all been talking about the emergence of 5G services, the Internet of Things (IoT) and the new high-capacity, low-latency network architectures that will be needed to support the resulting onslaught of bandwidth. Higher-speed data rates are critical to electronic evolution

Comparison of Wireless Technologies (Bluetooth, WiFi, BLE, Zigbee, Z-Wave, 6LoWPAN, NFC, WiFi…

https://predictabledesigns.com/wireless_technologies_bluetooth_wifi_zigbee_gsm_lte_lora_nb-iot_lte-m/ Deciding what type of wireless technology your new product should use can be an overwhelming task. This article has organized the various wireless technologies into a groups based on functionality, data speed, and operating range. This is a long, very detailed article.

The next version of HTTP won’t be using TCP | Ars Technica

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2018/11/the-next-version-of-http-wont-be-using-tcp/ HTTP is switching to a protocol layered on top of UDP. Today’s HTTP (versions 1.0, 1.1, and 2) are all layered on top of TCP (Transmission Control Protocol). TCP isn’t particularly tuned for the kinds of scenarios that HTTP is used for. TCP requires a number of round trips between client and server to