Cool uses for the Raspberry Pi

Hackers are buzzing with ideas from Pi-powered arcade machines and drones to the home automation and low-cost tablets. 10 coolest uses for the Raspberry Pi article tells that TechRepublic has delved into the Raspbery Pi’s developer forums, and here’s our round-up of the best ideas so far, ranging from the eminently achievable to the massively ambitious. You can use your Raspberry Pi for example as media streamer, arcade machine, tablet computer, robot controller and home automation controller. Rasberry Pi homepage offers also some more interesting projects like Retro games and a retro joystick.

1,653 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Rhaspberry Pi4 – Basic watering system for balcony

    Using NodeRED to set up basic automated watering of my plants on the balcony. Pump controls via a BLE moisture sensor. Powered by POE.

    https://hackaday.io/project/188129-rhaspberry-pi4-basic-watering-system-for-balcony

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Raspberry Pi GPIO Status LED Terminal Block Breakout Board HAT Test Expansion Board for Raspberry Pi 4B 3B+ 3B 3A+
    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005005242452216.html

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  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    The Raspberry Pi-powered Bird Sweeper safely and humanely chases nuisance birds away from outdoor spaces where they are causing problems.

    A Flockbuster Idea
    https://www.hackster.io/news/a-flockbuster-idea-0e59050d2502?fbclid=IwAR32m7aPy_BpThjW8M4fky6zSR2ac4JqpptZX4FlYK7VsctFzdsc6quY874

    The Raspberry Pi-powered Bird Sweeper safely and humanely chases nuisance birds away from outdoor spaces where they are causing problems.

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Google has announced the launch of MediaPipe for Raspberry Pi, offering a Python-based SDK for ML tasks complete with examples for audio classification, text classification, gesture recognition, and more.

    Google Launches MediaPipe for Raspberry Pi, Offering a Python SDK for Simplified On-Device ML
    https://www.hackster.io/news/google-launches-mediapipe-for-raspberry-pi-offering-a-python-sdk-for-simplified-on-device-ml-c821f5ff57b0?fbclid=IwAR34_pHqNMEqe7XbM6QAtKsOkF9Bxma-6jrCBCCU5_vYBLeP-tyWOvoDbz0

    Examples include on-device audio, text, and image classification, object detection, gesture recognition, and facial landmarking.

    Reply
  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Logic Analyzers: Tapping Into Raspberry Pi Secrets
    https://hackaday.com/2023/08/31/logic-analyzers-tapping-into-raspberry-pi-secrets/

    I’m using a $10 logic analyzer you can get off Aliexpress or Amazon, a laptop, and a Raspberry Pi with an SD card and a power supply.

    Reply
  6. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Sailor Hat Adds Graceful Shutdown To Pis
    https://hackaday.com/2023/09/18/sailor-hat-adds-graceful-shutdown-to-pis/

    Even though Windows and other operating systems constantly remind us to properly eject storage devices before removing them, plenty of people won’t heed those warnings until they finally corrupt a drive and cause all kinds of data loss and other catastrophes. It’s not just USB jump drives that can get corrupted, though. Any storage medium can become unusable if certain actions are being taken when the power is suddenly removed. That includes the SD cards on Raspberry Pis, too, and if your power isn’t reliable you might consider this hat to ensure they shut down properly during power losses.

    The Raspberry Pi hat is centered around a series of supercapacitors which provide power for the Pi temporarily. The hat also communicates with the Pi to let it know there is a loss of power, so that the Pi can automatically shut itself down in that situation to prevent corrupting the memory card. The hat is more than just a set of backup capacitors, though. The device is capable of taking input power from a wide range of sources and filtering it for the power requirements of the Pi

    https://docs.hatlabs.fi/sh-rpi/

    Reply
  7. Tomi Engdahl says:

    SDR dock 1.0

    Raspberry pi based open source device with SDR and easy to use controls for exploring RF signals and data.

    https://hackaday.io/project/192534-sdr-dock-10

    Reply
  8. Tomi Engdahl says:

    How to Program Raspberry Pi Remotely, Using a Browser with VS Code
    By Les Pounder
    published June 11, 2020
    Use the browser-based, code-server editor on your PC to write programs on your Raspberry Pi 4
    https://www.tomshardware.com/how-to/raspberry-pi-vs-code

    Reply
  9. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Create a web interface to control your Raspberry Pi
    https://www.aranacorp.com/en/create-a-web-interface-to-control-your-raspberry-pi/

    Reply
  10. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Limitbit Tech is preparing to launch a crowdfunding campaign for a compact companion robot, powered by a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4.

    Limitbit Tech’s Raspberry Pi-Powered Companion Bot, Doly, Crowdfunds Soon — or Build Your Own Now
    https://www.hackster.io/news/limitbit-tech-s-raspberry-pi-powered-companion-bot-doly-crowdfunds-soon-or-build-your-own-now-cae5d406c106?fbclid=IwAR3iQ9P2jfpkUSJkFnE62ti_KzsNeRI3SD-wDAo88Cej8ANKIQXGiGTkFUw

    Launching soon, and available to build yourself now, Doly is an edge AI-powered companion bot built with education in mind.

    Limitbit Tech is preparing to launch a crowdfunding campaign for a compact companion robot, powered by a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 — and has published a 3D-printable kit version right here on Hackster.io for those willing to do everything themselves.

    “Doly is a unique and innovative 3D-printable companion robot,” claims Limitbit founder and chief executive officer Levent Erenler of his company’s creation. “What sets Doly apart from other robots in the market is that it is based on open design and open hardware. This means that users have the freedom to customize and modify the robot according to their needs and preferences.”

    Reply
  11. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Manage your Raspberry Pi with Cockpit
    Establish central control over your Raspberry Pis with Cockpit.
    https://opensource.com/article/21/5/raspberry-pi-cockpit

    Reply
  12. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Node-RED:in käyttö Raspberry PI tietokoneessa ja ohjel-
    mien toteuttaminen MQTT-protokollaa hyödyntäe
    https://www.theseus.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/494568/Brandt_ONT.pdf?sequence=2

    Reply
  13. Tomi Engdahl says:

    https://www.hackster.io/news/sensors-simplified-7dc620bbe4b0

    Sensors Simplified
    TDK’s Sensor Board simplifies robotics by making a slew of high-performance sensors available to edge computing devices via a 40-pin header.

    Reply
  14. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Pis with Eyes for Affordable Optical Tracking
    Using Raspberry Pi Zeros and low-level programming techniques, AsterTrack promises to deliver high-quality 3D optical tracking on a budget.
    https://www.hackster.io/news/pis-with-eyes-for-affordable-optical-tracking-8d55e8eff1d9

    Reply
  15. Tomi Engdahl says:

    The caRPi Aims to Be a Raspberry Pi-Powered Universal Car Computer for Vintage Vehicles
    Supporting air suspension control, sensor monitoring, relay control, and even in-car entertainment, the caRPi wants to upgrade your ride.
    https://www.hackster.io/news/the-carpi-aims-to-be-a-raspberry-pi-powered-universal-car-computer-for-vintage-vehicles-a879b111da4e

    Reply
  16. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Detect Quakes With “Raspberry Shakes” Raspberry Pi–based seismometers can supplement existing networks
    https://spectrum.ieee.org/diy-seismometer

    Reply
  17. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Guillermo Perez Guillen’s Raspberry Pi Spectrometer Puts the Power of Light at Your Fingertips
    Between categorizing drinks and monitoring the health of plants, this open source spectrometer project offers a bright future.
    https://www.hackster.io/news/guillermo-perez-guillen-s-raspberry-pi-spectrometer-puts-the-power-of-light-at-your-fingertips-33cbbfd35373

    Reply
  18. Tomi Engdahl says:

    The Yamaha DX7 was released in 1983, with its FM synthesis engine completely revolutionizing the electronic music world at the time. It didn’t come cheap, and still doesn’t today, but we are blessed with emulators that can give us the same sound on a budget. In that vein, decided to whip up a Yamaha DX7 you can carry around in a little USB dongle. …

    A YAMAHA DX7 ON A USB DONGLE
    https://hackaday.com/2023/11/24/a-yamaha-dx7-on-a-usb-dongle/?fbclid=IwAR2K24mkun–XiCIuVGguE1okrndhCcuNaErGOuTVLX8BvUN8yY6SHTAeio

    The Yamaha DX7 was released in 1983, with its FM synthesis engine completely revolutionizing the electronic music world at the time. It didn’t come cheap, and still doesn’t today, but we are blessed with emulators that can give us the same sound on a budget. In that vein, [Kevin] decided to whip up a Yamaha DX7 you can carry around in a little USB dongle.

    The build centers around the use of a Raspberry Pi Zero, Zero W, or Zero 2W configured to run the MiniDEXED DX7 emulator.

    https://diyelectromusic.wordpress.com/2023/11/22/a-dx7-usb-dongle/

    Reply

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