Journalist and Media 2017

I have written on journalism and media trends eariler few years ago. So it is time for update. What is the state of journalism and news publishing in 2017? NiemanLab’s predictions for 2017 are a good place to start thinking about what lies ahead for journalism. There, Matt Waite puts us in our place straight away by telling us that the people running the media are the problem

There has been changes on tech publishing. In January 2017 International Data Group, the owner of PCWorld magazine and market researcher IDC, on Thursday said it was being acquired by China Oceanwide Holdings Group and IDG Capital, the investment management firm run by IDG China executive Hugo Shong. In 2016 Arrow bought EE Times, EDN, TechOnline and lots more from UBM.

 

Here are some article links and information bits on journalist and media in 2017:

Soothsayers’ guides to journalism in 2017 article take a look at journalism predictions and the value of this year’s predictions.

What Journalism Needs To Do Post-Election article tells that faced with the growing recognition that the electorate was uniformed or, at minimum, deeply in the thrall of fake news, far too many journalists are responding not with calls for change but by digging in deeper to exactly the kinds of practices that got us here in the first place.

Fake News Is About to Get Even Scarier than You Ever Dreamed article says that what we saw in the 2016 election is nothing compared to what we need to prepare for in 2020 as incipient technologies appear likely to soon obliterate the line between real and fake.

YouTube’s ex-CEO and co-founder Chad Hurley service sees a massive amount of information on the problem, which will lead to people’s backlash.

Headlines matter article tells that in 2017, headlines will matter more than ever and journalists will need to wrest control of headline writing from social-optimization teams. People get their news from headlines now in a way they never did in the past.

Why new journalism grads are optimistic about 2017 article tells that since today’s college journalism students have been in school, the forecasts for their futures has been filled with words like “layoffs,” “cutbacks,” “buyouts” and “freelance.” Still many people are optimistic about the future because the main motivation for being a journalist is often “to make a difference.”

Updating social media account can be a serious job. Zuckerberg has 12+ Facebook employees helping him with posts and comments on his Facebook page and professional photographers to snap personal moments.
Wikipedia Is Being Ripped Apart By a Witch Hunt For Secretly Paid Editors article tells that with undisclosed paid editing on the rise, Wikipedians and the Wikimedia Foundation are working together to stop the practice without discouraging user participation. Paid editing is permissible under Wikimedia Foundation’s terms of use as long as they disclose these conflicts of interest on their user pages, but not all paid editors make these disclosures.

Big Internet giants are working on how to make content better for mobile devices. Instant Articles is a new way for any publisher to create fast, interactive articles on Facebook. Google’s AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) is a project that it aims to accelerate content on mobile devices. Both of those systems have their advantages and problems.

Clearing Out the App Stores: Government Censorship Made Easier article tells that there’s a new form of digital censorship sweeping the globe, and it could be the start of something devastating. The centralization of the internet via app stores has made government censorship easier. If the app isn’t in a country’s app store, it effectively doesn’t exist. For more than a decade, we users of digital devices have actively championed an online infrastructure that now looks uniquely vulnerable to the sanctions of despots and others who seek to control information.

772 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Theodore Schleifer / Recode:
    Telegram, citing ToS, suspends public channel that incited violent anti-government protests in Iran; Telegram is a major platform with ~40M users in Iran — “There are lines one shouldn’t cross,” says the CEO of the popular messaging app. — The executives of Telegram …

    Telegram is shutting down a channel that called for violent protests against Iran’s government
    “There are lines one shouldn’t cross,” says the CEO of the popular messaging app.
    https://www.recode.net/2017/12/30/16833542/telegram-iran-demostrations-messaging-protests-pavel-durov

    The executives of Telegram, the widely used messaging app in Iran, are heeding calls from Iranian government officials to better police Telegram’s users as rallies in support and protest of the government sweep the country.

    Telegram is a major platform for information in Iran and counts more than 40 million users among the country’s 80 million people. And it has played an especially key role in this week’s anti-government protests against Ayatollah Khamenei. Counter-rallies supporting the government also emerged on Saturday.

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Hiroko Tabuchi / New York Times:
    Groups skeptical of climate change are gaming Google’s largely automated ad systems to promote misleading claims that reject established climate science

    How Climate Change Deniers
    Rise to the Top in Google Searches
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/29/climate/google-search-climate-change.html

    Groups that reject established climate science can use the search
    engine’s advertising business to their advantage, gaming the
    system to find a mass platform for false or misleading claims.

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Alex Hern / The Guardian:
    The chair of UK’s fake news inquiry committee has given Facebook and Twitter until January 18 to hand over info about Russian disinformation campaigns

    Facebook and Twitter threatened with sanctions in UK ‘fake news’ inquiry
    https://www.theguardian.com/media/2017/dec/28/facebook-and-twitter-threatened-with-sanctions-in-uk-fake-news-inquiry

    Chair of parliamentary committee gives firms a deadline to hand over information about Russian misinformation campaigns

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    BBC:
    Germany starts enforcing law under which social networks will face fines of up to €50M if they fail to remove hate speech, fake news, and illegal material

    Germany starts enforcing hate speech law
    http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-42510868?ocid=socialflow_twitter

    Germany is set to start enforcing a law that demands social media sites move quickly to remove hate speech, fake news and illegal material.

    Sites that do not remove “obviously illegal” posts could face fines of up to 50m euro (£44.3m).

    The law gives the networks 24 hours to act after they have been told about law-breaking material.

    Social networks and media sites with more than two million members will fall under the law’s provisions.

    Facebook, Twitter and YouTube will be the law’s main focus but it is also likely to be applied to Reddit, Tumblr and Russian social network VK. Other sites such as Vimeo and Flickr could also be caught up in its provisions.

    Reply
  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    ProPublica:
    Study shows Facebook’s hate speech rules are unevenly enforced, with the company agreeing its censors made mistakes on 22 of 49 posts submitted for explanation

    Facebook’s Uneven Enforcement of Hate Speech Rules Allows Vile Posts to Stay Up
    https://www.propublica.org/article/facebook-enforcement-hate-speech-rules-mistakes

    We asked Facebook about its handling of 49 posts that might be deemed offensive. The company acknowledged that its content reviewers had made the wrong call on 22 of them.

    Reply
  6. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Hiroko Tabuchi / New York Times:
    Groups skeptical of climate change are gaming Google’s largely automated ad systems to promote misleading claims that reject established climate science — Groups that reject established climate science can use the search engine’s advertising business to their advantage …

    How Climate Change Deniers Rise to the Top in Google Searches
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/29/climate/google-search-climate-change.html

    Groups that reject established climate science can use the search engine’s advertising business to their advantage, gaming the system to find a mass platform for false or misleading claims.

    Reply
  7. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Kaitlyn Tiffany / The Verge:
    Niche online communities and media grew in 2017, through Patreon, TinyLetter, “finstagrams”, and more as people looked for alternatives to Facebook and Twitter — Why tiny, weird online communities made a comeback in 2017 — Americans got tired of big social media in 2017.

    The year we wanted the internet to be smaller
    https://www.theverge.com/2017/12/28/16795090/internet-community-2017-post-mortem-tumblr-amino-drip-tinyletter

    Why tiny, weird online communities made a comeback in 2017

    Reply
  8. Tomi Engdahl says:

    The Logan Paul Video Should Be a Reckoning For YouTube
    https://www.wired.com/story/logan-paul-video-youtube-reckoning/

    By the time Logan Paul arrived at Aokigahara forest, colloquially known as Japan’s “suicide forest,” the YouTube star had already confused Mount Fuji with the country Fiji. His over 15 million (mostly underage) subscribers like this sort of comedic aloofness—it serves to make Paul more relatable.

    After hiking only a couple hundred yards into Aokigahara—where over 247 people attempted to take their own lives in 2010 alone,

    “Did we just find a dead person in the suicide forest?” Paul said to the camera. “This was supposed to be a fun vlog.” He went on to make several jokes about the victim, while wearing a large, fluffy green hat.

    Within a day, over 6.5 million people had viewed the footage, and Twitter flooded with outrage. Even though the video violated YouTube’s community standards, it was Paul in the end who deleted it.

    “I should have never posted the video, I should have put the cameras down,” Paul said in a video posted Tuesday, which followed an earlier written apology. “I’ve made a huge mistake, I don’t expect to be forgiven.” He didn’t respond to two follow-up requests for comment.

    YouTube, which failed to do anything about Paul’s video, has now found itself wrapped in another controversy over how and when it should police offensive and disturbing content on its platform

    Reply
  9. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Twitter:
    Twitter says it does not block or remove controversial tweets of world leaders because it would hide important information people should see and debate — There’s been a lot of discussion about political figures and world leaders on Twitter, and we want to share our stance.

    World Leaders on Twitter
    https://blog.twitter.com/official/en_us/topics/company/2017/world-leaders-and-twitter.html

    There’s been a lot of discussion about political figures and world leaders on Twitter, and we want to share our stance.

    Twitter is here to serve and help advance the global, public conversation. Elected world leaders play a critical role in that conversation because of their outsized impact on our society.

    Blocking a world leader from Twitter or removing their controversial Tweets would hide important information people should be able to see and debate. It would also not silence that leader, but it would certainly hamper necessary discussion around their words and actions.

    Reply
  10. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Lucia Moses / Digiday:
    A year after launch, Facebook Journalism Project gets mixed reviews for developing products with news outlets, providing training, and helping to curb hoaxes

    One year in, Facebook Journalism Project gets mixed reviews from publishers
    https://digiday.com/media/one-year-facebook-journalism-project-gets-mixed-reviews-publishers/

    A year ago, Facebook launched its Facebook Journalism Project. Led by Campbell Brown, the ex-NBC News anchor who was Facebook’s new head of news partnerships, the project was a high-profile effort to smooth relations with prominent news publishers. Facebook was getting blasted for the spread of fake news, contributing to filter bubbles and doing too little to help publishers make money on the platform.

    The challenge inherent in such a project is that publishers aren’t a monolithic group. They have a variety of different business models and want different things from Facebook.

    But there has been a lot of talk, not much action. Critics say the initiative hasn’t delivered in meaningful ways and is a public relations exercise aimed at placating publisher critics more than anything. For all the nice lunches, the power still lies with Facebook.

    Politics and business publisher Axios mainly uses Facebook for audience reach and not for monetization, so the project has “met my expectations” for more transparency about Facebook products

    “Do we have more control and say over what kinds of product they create?” Tucker said. “I’m not sure. But at least we get to get our voice into some part of the discussion.”

    In announcing the project, Facebook said it would in work three ways. The first was developing products with news organizations, including improving Instant Articles, Facebook’s fast-loading article format; and launching a subscription product. The second was providing training and tools for journalists, including social analytics tool CrowdTangle. The third part of the project was curbing news hoaxes and doing other things to inform readers about separating fact from fiction.

    “The Facebook Journalism Project has transformed the way we work internally and with the news industry,” Brown said in a statement. “We learned a great deal from our partners over the past year, and together we made significant strides in areas like increasing monetization and support for subscriptions, improving brand recognition for publishers and news literacy, and investing in training programs and tools like data insights. At the same time, Facebook has taken huge steps to fight false news, clickbait, and sensationalism. This coming year, FJP’s goal is to keep elevating the good and to make sure that quality journalism thrives on Facebook. We know there is more work to do, and we’re committed to it.”

    Reply
  11. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Happy New Year- Welcome to Linux Journal 2.0!
    http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/happy-new-year-linux-journal-alive

    Talk about a Happy New Year. The reason: it turns out we’re not dead. In fact, we’re more alive than ever, thanks to a rescue by readers—specifically, by the hackers who run Private Internet Access (PIA) VPN, a London Trust Media company. PIA are avid supporters of freenode and the larger FOSS community. They’re also all about Linux and the rest of the modern portfolio of allied concerns: privacy, crypto, freedom, personal agency, rewriting the rules of business and government around all of those, and having fun with constructive hacking of all kinds. We couldn’t have asked for a better rescue ship to come along for us.

    In addition, they aren’t merely rescuing this ship we were ready to scuttle; they’re making it seaworthy again and are committed to making it bigger and better than we were ever in a position to think about during our entirely self-funded past.

    First, the PIA people are hard-core Linux, free software and open-source hackers. They are just as committed to FOSS values as Phil Hughes was when he published the first issue of Linux Journal in April 1994

    Second, they’re eager to support us in building Linux Journal 2.0 around the substantial core of devoted readers we had through the many years of Linux Journal 1.x. And, this means we need to hear from you.

    Third, expect to see familiar names and faces continuing to work here.

    Reply
  12. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Let’s talk advertising
    http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/lets-talk-advertising?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+linuxjournalcom+%28Linux+Journal+-+The+Original+Magazine+of+the+Linux+Community%29

    As I say here,

    “Adtech is a cancer on advertisers, publishers, and everybody it tracks.

    We already have one form of chemo in ad blocking. According to PageFair’s 2017 Adblock Report, at least 11% of the world’s population is now blocking ads on at least 615 million devices. According to GlobalWebIndex, 37% of all mobile users, worldwide, were blocking ads by January of 2016, and another 42% would like to. With more than 4.77 billion mobile phone users in the world by 2017, that means more than 1.7 billion people are blocking ads already: a sum exceeding the population of the Western Hemisphere.

    Speaking personally, the one form of advertising I might be willing to bring back is sponsorship.

    One of our first jobs, once we get our Drupal act together, is figuring out a way to do comments without Disqus, which is the main source of tracking files on our site.

    Reply
  13. Tomi Engdahl says:

    No Level of Copyright Enforcement Will Ever Be Enough For Big Media
    https://torrentfreak.com/no-level-of-copyright-enforcement-will-ever-be-enough-for-big-media-180107/

    On an almost continual basis rightsholders are calling for tougher anti-piracy measures on top of more restrictive and punitive copyright law. It’s undoubtedly a threat to current Internet freedoms as we know them. But really, is anyone truly surprised that entertainment companies still hate their content being shared for free?

    Then peer-to-peer came along and it sparked a revolution.

    From the beginning, copyright holders felt that the law would answer their problems, whether that was by suing Napster, Kazaa, or even end users. Some industry players genuinely believed this strategy was just a few steps away from achieving its goals. Just a little bit more pressure and all would be under control.

    Ever since, this cycle has continued. Eager to stem the tide of content being shared without their permission, rightsholders have advocated stronger anti-piracy enforcement and lobbied for more restrictive interpretations of copyright law. Thus far, however, literally nothing has provided a solution.

    One would have thought that given the military-style raid on Kim Dotcom’s Megaupload, a huge void would’ve appeared in the sharing landscape. Instead, the file-locker business took itself apart and reinvented itself in jurisdictions outside the United States.

    With the SOPA debacle still fresh in relatively recent memory, copyright holders are still doggedly pursuing their aims. Site-blocking is rampant, advertisers are being pressured into compliance, and ISPs like Cox Communications now find themselves responsible for the infringements of their users. But has any of this caused any fatal damage to the sharing landscape? Not really.

    Instead, we’re seeing a rise in the use of streaming sites, each far more accessible to the newcomer than their predecessors and vastly more difficult for copyright holders to police.

    Systems built into Kodi are transforming these platforms into a plug-and-play piracy playground

    Faced with problems like these we are now seeing calls for even tougher legislation. While groups like the RIAA dream of filtering the Internet, over in the UK a 2017 consultation had copyright holders excited that end users could be criminalized for simply consuming infringing content, let alone distributing it.

    Reply
  14. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Pirate Bay Founder: Netflix and Spotify Are a Threat, No Solution
    https://torrentfreak.com/pirate-bay-founder-netflix-and-spotify-are-a-threat-no-solution-180107/

    Pirate Bay founder and former spokesperson Peter Sunde believes that piracy will decrease over time. However, people won’t be better off when online media distribution is in the hands of the powerful few. “Netflix, Spotify etc are not a solution, but a loss,” he says.

    Reply
  15. Tomi Engdahl says:

    A Field Guide to “Fake News” and Other Information
    https://fakenews.publicdatalab.org

    Disorders explores the use of digital methods to study false viral news, political memes, trolling practices and their social life online.

    It responds to an increasing demand for understanding the interplay between digital platforms, misleading information, propaganda and viral content practices, and their influence on politics and public life in democratic societies.

    Reply
  16. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Ripple, a Tinder spinoff backed by Match, launches app for professional networking
    https://techcrunch.com/2018/01/08/ripple-a-tinder-spinoff-backed-by-match-launches-app-for-professional-networking/?ncid=rss&utm_source=tcfbpage&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29&utm_content=FaceBook&sr_share=facebook

    A team of former Tinder employees, led by Tinder’s original CTO Ryan Ogle, are today launching a new app aimed at professional networking. The app, called Ripple, aims to be a sort of mobile-first alternative to LinkedIn that addresses some of the problems common to the aging, now Microsoft-owned business networking platform.

    https://rippleapp.com

    Reply
  17. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Mike Isaac / New York Times:
    Zuckerberg says News Feed will focus on what friends share, de-emphasize content from publishers and brands as it moves to favor interactions over passive posts
    http://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/11/technology/facebook-news-feed.html

    Jason Koebler / Motherboard:
    Facebook’s News Feed changes are good for media industry in the long term; journalism engineered to be picked by an algorithm is not journalism, it’s marketing — Thursday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told the New York Times that the social network will revamp its news feed to emphasize …

    Facebook Is Deprioritizing Our Stories. Good.
    A society that relies on a centralized portal to get its news may very well be doomed.
    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/zmqgn4/facebook-algorithm-news-feed-change

    Thursday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told the New York Times that the social network will revamp its news feed to emphasize “meaningful interaction” between friends and family. As a result, the news feed will significantly decrease the number of posts you’ll see from news outlets such as Motherboard.

    Thursday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told the New York Times that the social network will revamp its news feed to emphasize “meaningful interaction” between friends and family. As a result, the news feed will significantly decrease the number of posts you’ll see from news outlets such as Motherboard.

    Good.

    This move has been long-rumored, and has been looked at by many in the industry as an incoming algorithmic apocalypse that will have far-reaching impacts on the bottom lines and ultimate survival of outlets whose readers find them through Facebook. But my hope is that we’ll come out of this with a healthier news media.

    Reply
  18. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Facebook stock dips after the platform deprioritizes publishers
    https://techcrunch.com/2018/01/12/facebook-stock-news-feed-change-january-2018/?ncid=rss&utm_source=tcfbpage&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29&sr_share=facebook

    Facebook shares fell around 5 percent on Friday following the news that the company would retool its News Feed to boost social interactions over stories from publishers.

    Reply
  19. Tomi Engdahl says:

    ECJ to rule on whether Facebook needs to hunt for hate speech
    https://techcrunch.com/2018/01/11/ecj-to-rule-on-whether-facebook-needs-to-hunt-for-hate-speech/

    Austria’s Supreme Court is referring a legal challenge over the extent of Facebook’s responsibility to remove hate speech postings to Europe’s top court for an opinion (via derStandard.at). The case has clear implications for freedom of speech online.

    Reply
  20. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Europe keeps up the pressure on social media over illegal content takedowns
    https://techcrunch.com/2018/01/09/europe-keeps-up-the-pressure-on-social-media-over-illegal-content-takedowns/

    The European Union’s executive body is continuing to pressure social media firms to get better at removing illegal content from their platforms before it has a chance to spread further online.

    After attending a meeting on the topic today, Andrus Ansip, the European Commissioner for Digital Single Market, tweeted to say the main areas tech firms need to be addressing are that “takedown should be fast, reliable, effective; pro-activity to detect, remove and disable content using automatic detection and filtering; adequate safeguards and counter notice”

    For example, a new social media hate speech law in Germany, which as of this month is being actively enforced, has already draw criticism

    Another problematic aspect to the Commission’s push is it appears keen to bundle up a very wide spectrum of ‘illegal content’ into the same response category — apparently aiming to conflate issues as diverse as hate speech, terrorism, child exploitation and copyrighted content.

    Reply
  21. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Is this fake news or truth on fake news?

    The Highly-Anticipated 2017 Fake News Awards
    https://gop.com/the-highly-anticipated-2017-fake-news-awards/

    2017 was a year of unrelenting bias, unfair news coverage, and even downright fake news. Studies have shown that over 90% of the media’s coverage of President Trump is negative.

    Reply

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