Journalist and Media 2017

I have written on journalism and media trends eariler few years ago. So it is time for update. What is the state of journalism and news publishing in 2017? NiemanLab’s predictions for 2017 are a good place to start thinking about what lies ahead for journalism. There, Matt Waite puts us in our place straight away by telling us that the people running the media are the problem

There has been changes on tech publishing. In January 2017 International Data Group, the owner of PCWorld magazine and market researcher IDC, on Thursday said it was being acquired by China Oceanwide Holdings Group and IDG Capital, the investment management firm run by IDG China executive Hugo Shong. In 2016 Arrow bought EE Times, EDN, TechOnline and lots more from UBM.

 

Here are some article links and information bits on journalist and media in 2017:

Soothsayers’ guides to journalism in 2017 article take a look at journalism predictions and the value of this year’s predictions.

What Journalism Needs To Do Post-Election article tells that faced with the growing recognition that the electorate was uniformed or, at minimum, deeply in the thrall of fake news, far too many journalists are responding not with calls for change but by digging in deeper to exactly the kinds of practices that got us here in the first place.

Fake News Is About to Get Even Scarier than You Ever Dreamed article says that what we saw in the 2016 election is nothing compared to what we need to prepare for in 2020 as incipient technologies appear likely to soon obliterate the line between real and fake.

YouTube’s ex-CEO and co-founder Chad Hurley service sees a massive amount of information on the problem, which will lead to people’s backlash.

Headlines matter article tells that in 2017, headlines will matter more than ever and journalists will need to wrest control of headline writing from social-optimization teams. People get their news from headlines now in a way they never did in the past.

Why new journalism grads are optimistic about 2017 article tells that since today’s college journalism students have been in school, the forecasts for their futures has been filled with words like “layoffs,” “cutbacks,” “buyouts” and “freelance.” Still many people are optimistic about the future because the main motivation for being a journalist is often “to make a difference.”

Updating social media account can be a serious job. Zuckerberg has 12+ Facebook employees helping him with posts and comments on his Facebook page and professional photographers to snap personal moments.
Wikipedia Is Being Ripped Apart By a Witch Hunt For Secretly Paid Editors article tells that with undisclosed paid editing on the rise, Wikipedians and the Wikimedia Foundation are working together to stop the practice without discouraging user participation. Paid editing is permissible under Wikimedia Foundation’s terms of use as long as they disclose these conflicts of interest on their user pages, but not all paid editors make these disclosures.

Big Internet giants are working on how to make content better for mobile devices. Instant Articles is a new way for any publisher to create fast, interactive articles on Facebook. Google’s AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) is a project that it aims to accelerate content on mobile devices. Both of those systems have their advantages and problems.

Clearing Out the App Stores: Government Censorship Made Easier article tells that there’s a new form of digital censorship sweeping the globe, and it could be the start of something devastating. The centralization of the internet via app stores has made government censorship easier. If the app isn’t in a country’s app store, it effectively doesn’t exist. For more than a decade, we users of digital devices have actively championed an online infrastructure that now looks uniquely vulnerable to the sanctions of despots and others who seek to control information.

1,372 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Daniel Oberhaus / Motherboard:
    Researchers warn so-called “perceptual” ad blockers, which aim to visually recognize ads on a page to block them, are ineffective and create new attack vectors — Perceptual ad blockers will come out on the losing side in the war against internet advertisers and expose users …

    Researchers Defeat Most Powerful Ad Blockers, Declare a ‘New Arms Race’
    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/xwjzka/researchers-defeat-most-powerful-ad-blockers-declare-a-new-arms-race

    Last year, Princeton researchers created a perceptual ad blocker, which could visually locate advertisements on a webpage and filter them out. This plugin was supposed to be the “ad blocking superweapon” that would put an end to the ad-blocking arms race since it didn’t target ads based on their code, but on the way they looked on the page.

    According to new research published this week on arXiv, however, an AI was able to defeat perceptual ad blockers. Moreover, the researchers warned, ad blockers will be on the losing side of the arms race and expose their users to new attack vectors in the process.

    Perceptual ad blockers will come out on the losing side in the war against internet advertisers and expose users to a host of new attack vectors in the process, the researchers warned.

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Susan Wojcicki / YouTube Creator Blog:
    YouTube CEO says open platforms hosting content can not be expected to enforce EU’s Article 13 copyright restrictions and none will take the financial risk

    The Potential Unintended Consequences of Article 13
    Monday, November 12, 2018
    https://youtube-creators.googleblog.com/2018/11/i-support-goals-of-article-13-i-also.html

    We have worked hard to ensure creators and artists are fairly compensated for their work. In the last year, YouTube paid content owners across the EU €800m. We have also paid the global music industry more than €1.5bn from advert-generated revenue alone. However, this creator economy is under threat from a section of the EU’s efforts to revise its copyright directive, known as article 13, which holds internet companies directly responsible for any copyright infringement in the content shared on their platform. While we support the goals of article 13, the European Parliament’s current proposal will create unintended consequences that will have a profound impact on the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of people.

    The parliament’s approach is unrealistic in many cases because copyright owners often disagree over who owns what rights. If the owners cannot agree, it is impossible to expect the open platforms that host this content to make the correct rights decisions.

    Take the global music hit “Despacito”. This video contains multiple copyrights, ranging from sound recording to publishing rights. Although YouTube has agreements with multiple entities to license and pay for the video, some of the rights holders remain unknown. That uncertainty means we might have to block videos like this to avoid liability under article 13. Multiply that risk with the scale of YouTube, where more than 400 hours of video are uploaded every minute, and the potential liabilities could be so large that no company could take on such a financial risk. We have already taken steps to address copyright infringement by developing technology, like our Content ID programme

    To date, we have used the system to pay rights holders more than €2.5bn for third party use of their content. We believe Content ID provides the best solution for managing rights on a global scale.

    We welcome the chance to work with policymakers and the industry to develop a solution within article 13 that protects rights holders while also allowing the creative economy to thrive.

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    China’s State-Run Media Has A Virtual News Anchor That Looks Terrifyingly Real
    https://www.iflscience.com/technology/chinas-staterun-media-has-a-virtual-news-anchor-that-looks-terrifyingly-real/

    Xinhua, China’s state news agency, has just revealed new additions to its team: digitally reconstructed television news anchors powered by artificial intelligence (AI) technology.

    Dressed in crisp suits with distinctly sleek news anchor haircuts, the two new hosts were unveiled this week

    Journalists simply have to type the script into a computer and the AI anchor will read out the text in a synthesized voice, complete with all the subtle gestures and expressions you’d expect to see with a real human.

    “The development of the media industry calls for continuous innovation and deep integration with the international advanced technologies… I look forward to bringing you brand-new news experiences.”

    The virtual puppets, which appear to be very similar to the technology used to make “DeepFake” videos, was developed by Xinhua and the Chinese search engine, Sogou.com. Xinhua says that the anchors “can work 24 hours a day on its official website and various social media platforms, reducing news production costs and improving efficiency.”

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    US, Russia and China refuse to back French cybersecurity initiative
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2018/11/12/us-russia-china-refuse-back-french-cybersecurity-initiative/

    The US, China and Russia have refused to endorse a French-backed agreement designed to regulate the Internet and bolster cyber security, despite the approval of 51 other countries including all members of the European Union.

    The Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace was launched by French President Emmanuel Macron on Monday and represents an attempt to set clear rules for the use of cyber-weapons.

    At an event organised by UNESCO, the French leader set out his ambitions for stronger international regulation of the Internet and better cooperation on cyber-attacks, foreign meddling in elections, online censorship and hate speech.

    But the refusal of Washington DC, Moscow and Beijing to sign up to the agreement represents a serious blow for the initiative.

    “The internet is a space currently managed by a technical community of private players. But it’s not governed. So now that half of humanity is online, we need to find new ways to organize the internet,” a French official said. “Otherwise, the internet as we know it today — free, open and secure — will be damaged by the new threats.”

    Reply
  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Helsingissä asuvan amerikkalaisyrittäjän Rob Guinnessin mielestä sosiaalinen media on rikki. Erityisesti hän on pettynyt yksityisyyskohuissa ryvettyneeseen Facebookiin ja aikoo perustaa oman kryptatun somepalvelunsa.

    Mies ei ole huolensa kanssa yksin, sillä hengenheimolaisia löytyy erityisesti MyData-yhteisöstä

    ”Facebook yrittää tehdä liian monta asiaa kerralla.”

    https://www.tivi.fi/Kaikki_uutiset/eilen-olit-foliohattu-huomenna-viisas-6748694

    Reply
  6. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Facebook Says Any Return to China Would Preserve Free Expression
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-11-14/facebook-says-any-return-to-china-would-preserve-free-expression

    Facebook Inc. said if it ever returns to China, the company will do it in a way that preserves rights to free expression and privacy — issues that make such a move almost impossible today.

    The social-media giant made the comments in a written response to questions from U.S. senators. Facebook’s stance is more cautious than Google, which is trying to get its search engine back into China. That project has sparked harsh criticism and debate from employees and outsiders, who say the company is violating its mission.

    Reply
  7. Tomi Engdahl says:

    New York Times:
    Interviews with more than 50 people show how Facebook stumbled in dealing with multiple crises, which Zuckerberg and Sandberg initially tried to obscure

    Delay, Deny and Deflect: How Facebook’s Leaders Fought Through Crisis
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/14/technology/facebook-data-russia-election-racism.html

    Inside Facebook’s Menlo Park, Calif., headquarters, top executives gathered in the glass-walled conference room of its founder, Mark Zuckerberg. It was September 2017, more than a year after Facebook engineers discovered suspicious Russia-linked activity on its site, an early warning of the Kremlin campaign to disrupt the 2016 American election. Congressional and federal investigators were closing in on evidence that would implicate the company.

    But it wasn’t the looming disaster at Facebook that angered Ms. Sandberg. It was the social network’s security chief, Alex Stamos, who had informed company board members the day before that Facebook had yet to contain the Russian infestation.

    “You threw us under the bus!” she yelled at Mr. Stamos, according to people who were present.

    In just over a decade, Facebook has connected more than 2.2 billion people, a global nation unto itself that reshaped political campaigns, the advertising business and daily life around the world. Along the way, Facebook accumulated one of the largest-ever repositories of personal data, a treasure trove of photos, messages and likes that propelled the company into the Fortune 500.

    Mr. Zuckerberg, 34, and Ms. Sandberg, 49, remain at the company’s helm, while Mr. Stamos and other high-profile executives have left after disputes over Facebook’s priorities. Mr. Zuckerberg, who controls the social network with 60 percent of the voting shares and who approved many of its directors, has been asked repeatedly in the last year whether he should step down as chief executive.

    His answer each time: a resounding “No.”
    ‘Don’t Poke the Bear’

    Facebook’s lofty aims were emblazoned even on securities filings: “Our mission is to make the world more open and connected.”

    But as Facebook grew, so did the hate speech, bullying and other toxic content on the platform. When researchers and activists in Myanmar, India, Germany and elsewhere warned that Facebook had become an instrument of government propaganda and ethnic cleansing, the company largely ignored them. Facebook had positioned itself as a platform, not a publisher. Taking responsibility for what users posted, or acting to censor it, was expensive and complicated. Many Facebook executives worried that any such efforts would backfire.

    New York Times:
    Source: Facebook has ended its relationship with Definers Public Affairs, the consulting firm which cast George Soros as a force behind Facebook’s critics — SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook has ended its relationship with a Washington-based consulting firm, Definers Public Affairs …
    Facebook Cuts Ties With Definers Public Affairs Following Outcry
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/15/technology/facebook-definers-soros.html

    Reply
  8. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Deepa Seetharaman / Wall Street Journal:
    Internal Facebook survey shows just 52% of its staff are optimistic about its future, down 32% from last year, amid scandals and a sharp stock decline

    Facebook Morale Takes a Tumble Along With Stock Price
    Employee surveys show weaker optimism about future, confidence in platform’s mission
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/facebook-morale-takes-a-tumble-along-with-stock-price-1542200400?mod=hp_lead_pos5

    Facebook Inc.’s difficult year is taking a toll on employee morale, with several key measures of internal sentiment taking a sharp turn for the worse over the past year, according to people familiar with the matter and messages reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.

    Reply
  9. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Casey Newton / The Interface:
    One reason for Facebook’s aggressive PR against competitors was to manage declining morale, and retain employees who would otherwise jump ship

    Facebook fights dirty
    https://www.getrevue.co/profile/caseynewton/issues/facebook-fights-dirty-145113

    For some time now, Facebook has copped to being “slow.”
    Confronted with any question about Russian interference on the platform, or the scourge of misinformation, Facebook has gotten comfortable saying it was “slow to recognize” the problem, before rattling off a list of every step it has since taken to solve it.

    Reply
  10. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Mark Zuckerberg / Facebook:
    Facebook plans to let users opt-in to borderline content, appeal content decisions to independent body in 2019, work with governments on content regulation — My focus in 2018 has been addressing the most important issues facing Facebook. As the year wraps up, I’m writing a series of notes …

    A Blueprint for Content Governance and Enforcement
    https://www.facebook.com/notes/mark-zuckerberg/a-blueprint-for-content-governance-and-enforcement/10156443129621634/

    Adi Robertson / The Verge:
    Facebook’s second content moderation report: from April to September, 1.5B fake accounts were closed and 23.3M instances of violent content were removed — Facebook’s latest transparency report shows a big jump in spam and violent content takedowns, some advances in proactively identifying hate speech …

    Facebook removed a lot of spam, violence, and fake accounts this year
    https://www.theverge.com/2018/11/15/18097086/facebook-transparency-report-fall-summer-2018-community-standards-hate-speech

    Reply
  11. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Saudi Arabia’s latest account of Khashoggi’s death is shocking in its audacity
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/global-opinions/saudi-arabias-latest-account-of-khashoggis-death-is-shocking-in-its-audacity/2018/11/15/4e236dc0-e8f1-11e8-a939-9469f1166f9d_story.html?utm_term=.bcd7c502163f

    The Saudis change their story — again. Congress should not allow this travesty to continue.

    authorities in Riyadh reverted to an earlier, discredited tale: that Mr. Khashoggi was killed spontaneously inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul by a team sent to return him to Saudi Arabia.
    While reporting that 11 suspects had been indicted and that the death penalty would be sought for five of them

    By offering up this incredible account, the Saudi regime is baldly defying all those, including leading members of Congress, who called for full disclosure and accountability. Yet the Trump administration appears ready to accept its stonewalling.

    Accepting the Saudi story means ignoring a number of well-established facts.

    Reply
  12. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Gerret Von Nordheim / European Journalism Observatory:
    Study: analysis of 3M articles from 2004 to 2016 shows quotations of social media plateaued at the start of the decade but have increased in the last few years — It feels as if half the world usually sees Donald Trump’s latest tweets – because the media quote them, comment on them and inadvertently help them to spread even further.

    Journalists Quote Social Media Content Ever More Frequently
    https://en.ejo.ch/research/journalists-quote-social-media-content-ever-more-frequently

    It feels as if half the world usually sees Donald Trump’s latest tweets – because the media quote them, comment on them and inadvertently help them to spread even further.

    Nowadays, journalists use social media as a source on a regular basis. The days when social media only counted as a legitimate source if journalists had no other access to events like disasters or civil war have long since passed. Instead, they have become part of the fabric of modern journalism.

    Reply
  13. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Mark Zuckerberg / Facebook:
    Facebook to demote borderline content in News Feed by default, publish minutes of policy meetings, and let users appeal content decisions to an independent body — My focus in 2018 has been addressing the most important issues facing Facebook. As the year wraps up, I’m writing a series …

    A Blueprint for Content Governance and Enforcement
    https://www.facebook.com/notes/mark-zuckerberg/a-blueprint-for-content-governance-and-enforcement/10156443129621634/

    Reply
  14. Tomi Engdahl says:

    NBC News:
    One lobbying firm used by Facebook runs a “news” site with good posts for clients, negative posts on rivals, and a “Media/News” Facebook page followed by 120K+

    Facebook hired firm with ‘in-house fake news shop’ to combat PR crisis
    https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/tech-news/facebook-hired-firm-house-fake-news-shop-combat-pr-crisis-n936591

    Facebook’s ties to Definers Public Affairs, first reported on Wednesday in The New York Times, sparked widespread criticism and accusations of hypocrisy.

    Reply
  15. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Karl Bode / Techdirt:
    Facebook’s use of Definers Public Affairs is by no means unique, mirroring the way the telecom industry uses think tanks, PR firms, and bogus news operations — So by now most people have probably read the New York Times deep dive into what can only be described as Facebook’s deep well of internal dysfunction and self delusion.

    Facebook’s Use Of Smear Merchants Is The Norm, Not The Exception
    https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20181115/10073141056/facebooks-use-smear-merchants-is-norm-not-exception.shtml

    So by now most people have probably read the New York Times deep dive into what can only be described as Facebook’s deep well of internal dysfunction and self delusion. While there’s a lot of interesting bits in the piece, one portion that received some extra, justified hyperventilation was the revelation of Facebook’s use of smear merchants. Smear merchants that the Times notes Facebook employed to try and discredit those pointing out that Facebook’s privacy practices have generally been hot garbage

    Delay, Deny and Deflect: How Facebook’s Leaders Fought Through Crisis
    Image
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/14/technology/facebook-data-russia-election-racism.html

    Reply
  16. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Wall Street Journal:
    Sources: DOJ is preparing to prosecute WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange; exact charges are unclear but could possibly involve the Espionage Act — Over the past year, U.S. prosecutors have discussed several types of charges they could potentially bring against the WikiLeaks founder

    U.S. Is Optimistic It Will Prosecute Assange
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-is-optimistic-it-will-prosecute-assange-1542323142

    Over the past year, U.S. prosecutors have discussed several types of charges they could potentially bring against the WikiLeaks founder

    Reply
  17. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Jacob Kastrenakes / The Verge:
    Facebook to demote “borderline content” in News Feed by default and let users appeal content moderation decisions to an independent body

    Facebook will reduce reach of ‘sensationalist and provocative’ content
    https://www.theverge.com/2018/11/15/18097402/facebook-borderline-sensationalist-provocative-content-algorithm-changes

    The new term is ‘borderline content’

    acebook is once again tweaking how stories spread through the News Feed, this time going after posts that are “sensationalist and provocative.” The goal isn’t just to cut down on clickbait, but to cut down on misinformation and problematic posts that don’t quite warrant an outright ban on the site.

    In a blog post, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg writes that people naturally engage more with sensationalist content. Engagement with this content, he says, increases the closer it gets to being so problematic that it has to be banned.

    So instead of moving the line of what’s banned, Facebook is going to alter its distribution algorithms. Posts that Facebook’s AI detects as needlessly provocative will be distributed less and less, preventing them from seeing a spike in engagement.

    https://www.facebook.com/notes/mark-zuckerberg/a-blueprint-for-content-governance-and-enforcement/10156443129621634/

    Reply
  18. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Adi Robertson / The Verge:
    Facebook’s second content moderation report: from April to September, 1.5B fake accounts were closed and 23.3M instances of violent content were removed — Facebook’s latest transparency report shows a big jump in spam and violent content takedowns, some advances in proactively identifying hate speech …
    https://www.theverge.com/2018/11/15/18097086/facebook-transparency-report-fall-summer-2018-community-standards-hate-speech

    Reply
  19. Tomi Engdahl says:

    What’s next? The top media executives on the job market
    https://techcrunch.com/2018/11/12/whats-next-the-top-media-executives-on-the-job-market/?utm_source=tcfbpage&sr_share=facebook

    Keep an eye out for the next moves by these entrepreneurs and executives. A number of the biggest names in media left their jobs over the last year (or announced they will be leaving soon), including a handful of now-billionaires who have resources, ambition, and time on their hands to explore something new.

    Reply
  20. Tomi Engdahl says:

    BBC:
    An in-depth look at how misinformation and incendiary images on Facebook are spreading in Nigeria, where police say they contributed to a dozen recent killings — Nigerian police say false information on Facebook is killing people — Nigerian police say false information and incendiary images …

    Like. Share. Kill.
    Nigerian police say false information on Facebook is killing people
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-sh/nigeria_fake_news

    Nigerian police say false information and incendiary images on Facebook have contributed to more than a dozen recent killings in Plateau State – an area already torn by ethnic violence.

    When BBC Africa Eye got in touch with Facebook, the company disabled the account of a man in the UK who was spreading misinformation to thousands in Nigeria.

    Reply
  21. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Rebecca Mead / New Yorker:
    How podcasts, whose audio narratives offer a rare opportunity for slow immersion, became a seductive mode of storytelling that can sometimes be manipulative

    How Podcasts Became a Seductive—and Sometimes Slippery—Mode of Storytelling
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/11/19/how-podcasts-became-a-seductive-and-sometimes-slippery-mode-of-storytelling?currentPage=all

    In our frenetic age, audio narratives offer a rare opportunity for slow immersion. But this intimacy can become manipulative.

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*