Gartner Magic Quadrant for Cloud IaaS 2017

Gartner has published a new magic quadrant for infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) – the results should not be surprising to anybody. Consider this posting as update to my previous cloud market posting few years back. Here is reporting on newest cloud market trends from two sources:
Gartner puts AWS, Microsoft Azure top of its Magic Quadrant for IaaS | ZDNet

https://www.google.fi/amp/www.zdnet.com/google-amp/article/gartner-puts-aws-microsoft-azure-top-of-its-magic-quadrant-for-iaas/

Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure dominate the infrastructure-as-a-service field, according to Gartner, which released its IaaS Magic Quadrant.

However, Google Cloud is emerging as a key challenger.

Gartner confirms what we all know: AWS and Microsoft are the cloud leaders, by a fair way

https://www.google.fi/amp/s/www.theregister.co.uk/AMP/2017/06/19/gartner_confirms_what_we_all_know_aws_and_microsoft_are_the_cloud_leaders_by_a_fair_way/

Paranormal parallelogram for IaaS has Google on the same lap, IBM and Oracle trailing

58 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    ‘Biggest Data Center’ To Be Built in Arctic
    https://hardware.slashdot.org/story/17/08/15/1726209/biggest-data-center-to-be-built-in-arctic

    A small town in the remote north of the Arctic Circle is set to be home to the world’s largest data center. From a report:
    The firm behind the project, Kolos, says the chilled air and abundant hydropower available locally would help it keep its energy costs down. The area, however, suffers the country’s highest rate of sick leave from work, which may be related to its past as a mining community. The US-Norwegian company says it has already raised “several million dollars” for the project from Norwegian private investors. However, it is still working with a US investment bank to secure the remaining necessary funds.

    Record-sized data centre planned inside Arctic Circle
    http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-40922048

    Plans to build the world’s “largest” data centre are being made public.

    The facility is set to be created at the Norwegian town of Ballangen, which is located inside the Arctic Circle.

    The firm behind the project, Kolos, says the chilled air and abundant hydropower available locally would help it keep its energy costs down.

    The area, however, suffers the country’s highest rate of sick leave from work, which may be related to its past as a mining community.

    The US-Norwegian company says it has already raised “several million dollars” for the project from Norwegian private investors.

    However, it is still working with a US investment bank to secure the remaining necessary funds.

    Cheap energy

    Tech consultancy Gartner says this has meant private endeavours have needed to seek scale of their own in order to keep their prices competitive.

    “There’s always a danger with this kind of thing that providers rush to build capacity that outstrips what the market requires,” added David Groombridge, research director at tech consultancy Gartner.

    “But in terms of data centres, it’s hard to see consumer-driven demands dropping off and there’s the promise of the internet-of-things, with millions of sensors generating information that will need to be processed.

    “So, unless there are radical new technologies that come along very quickly to help compress data, we will need the resources that these kind of facilities provide.”

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Norway gets the world’s largest data center

    The beginner data center entrepreneur Kolos starts right away with full steam. The Norwegian company builds Narvik near Ballangeni the world’s largest data center. When all servers are in use, the center needs gigawatts of power.

    Gigawatt is a shocking power requirement. For example, Google’s Hamina Center is a 72-megawatt facility and Facebook’s center in Sweden consumes 120 megawatts.

    According to Kolos, the northern data center starts with 70 megawatts of consumption. All the energy used in the plant comes from renewable sources. Norway has a lot of hydropower.

    Source: http://www.etn.fi/index.php/13-news/6677-norjaan-tulee-maailman-suurin-datakeskus

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Microsoft launches Azure Event Grid, a fully managed event routing service
    https://techcrunch.com/2017/08/16/microsoft-launches-azure-event-grid-a-fully-managed-event-routing-service/

    Microsoft announced a new product in its Azure line-up in preview today that will make it easier for developers to build event-based applications.

    The Azure Event Grid makes events (like uploading a picture or video, clicking a button, updating a database, etc.) first-class Azure objects. Event Grid complements Azure Functions and Azure Logic Apps, Microsoft’s existing serverless offerings, and gives developers access to a fully managed event routing service. This new service gives them the flexibility to ingest and react to virtually any event — whether that’s happening inside Azure or on a third-party service or in an existing application.

    Developers can use Event Grid to route events to specific endpoints (or even multiple endpoints) and filter them as necessary.

    “Serverless” has always been a misnomer, given that even the most serverless of serverless applications still needs to run on servers. Still, the basic idea behind serverless platforms is that you can use this model to build event-driven applications without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure.

    Indeed, Microsoft director of Azure Compute Corey Sanders told me that Event Grid actually sits on top of Service Fabric, Microsoft’s platform for building microservices.

    Event Grid takes the ideas of Azure Functions and Logic Apps a bit further, though, thanks to its built-in ability to take inputs from any application with the help of webhook endpoints

    Out of the box, Event Grid also supports Azure Blog Storage, Resource Manager, Application Topics, Event Hubs, Azure Functions, Azure Automation and Logic Apps, with support for other Azure-based services, including the new CosmosDB database service and IoT Hub, coming later this year. Given that IoT applications are a logical fit for this service, it’s actually a bit of a surprise that support for IoT Hub isn’t part of this initial release.

    Pricing for Event Grid is based on the number of operations you process. The first 100,00 operations are free; after that, you pay $0.60 per million operations

    Operations are defined as any ingress, advanced match, delivery attempt or management call.

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Five characteristics of cloud computing
    http://www.controleng.com/single-article/five-characteristics-of-cloud-computing/d3d1cbc797f4149ba98d082e466f08f3.html

    Cloud computing’s characteristics and benefits include on-demand self-service, broad network access, and being very elastic and scalable.

    As cloud computing services mature both commercially and technologically, it will be easier for companies to maximize the potential benefits. Knowing what cloud computing is and what it does, however, is just as important. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) defines cloud computing as it is known today through five particular characteristics.

    1. On-demand self-service
    2. Broad network access
    3. Multi-tenancy and resource pooling
    4. Rapid elasticity and scalability
    5. Measured service

    Cloud computing resources usage is metered and manufacturing organizations pay accordingly for what they have used. Resource utilization can be optimized by leveraging charge-per-use capabilities. This means that cloud resource usage—whether virtual server instances that are running or storage in the cloud—gets monitored, measured and reported by the cloud service provider.

    Reply
  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Jon Fingas / Engadget:
    Code42 says it will end its cloud backup service Crashplan for Home on Oct 23, 2018 and focus instead on its business services — If you rely on Crashplan as a remote backup for your computer, you’re going to have to find an alternative in short order. Code42 is phasing out its Crashplan …

    Crashplan drops its cloud backup service for home users
    You’ll have to find an alternative to safeguard your files online.
    https://www.engadget.com/2017/08/22/crashplan-drops-cloud-backups-for-home-users/

    If you rely on Crashplan as a remote backup for your computer, you’re going to have to find an alternative in short order. Code42 is phasing out its Crashplan for Home service as it switches its focus to business users. The company has stopped offering new or renewed Home subscriptions as of August 22nd, and the service will shut down entirely on October 23rd, 2018. If you haven’t moved your files elsewhere by then, you’re out of luck. The team is trying to make the transition as gentle as possible, at least. It’s extending all Home subscriptions by 60 days to give people time to find alternatives, and it’s offering discounts for both its own Small Business tier and a preferred alternative, Carbonite.

    You don’t have to go to either of those options, of course. Alternatives like Backblaze exist if you need to safeguard absolutely everything, and you can use free or low-cost services like Google Drive if you’re just interested in protecting a limited number of can’t-lose files.

    The move isn’t entirely shocking, especially in an era where ISP data caps make it impractical to upload the entire contents of your PC. Businesses are more likely to need that absolute protection, and their tendency to subscribe in bulk makes them tempting targets.

    Reply
  6. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Salvador Rodriguez / Reuters:
    Google says it will announce specs for Titan, a security chip that scans cloud hardware for evidence of tampering, on Thursday

    Google touts Titan security chip to market cloud services
    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-alphabet-google-titan-idUSKCN1B22D6

    SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Alphabet Inc’s (GOOGL.O) Google this week will disclose technical details of its new Titan computer chip, an elaborate security feature for its cloud computing network that the company hopes will enable it to steal a march on Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O) and Microsoft Corp (MSFT.O).

    Titan is the size of a tiny stud earring that Google has installed in each of the many thousands of computer servers and network cards that populate its massive data centers that power Google’s cloud services.

    Google is hoping Titan will help it carve out a bigger piece of the worldwide cloud computing market, which is forecast by Gartner to be worth nearly $50 billion.

    Reply
  7. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Tom Krazit / GeekWire:
    Google Cloud Platform launches cheaper Standard Tier traffic networking option that uses public internet, not its fiber

    Google unveils a new, cheaper networking option for cloud customers: the public internet
    https://www.geekwire.com/2017/google-unveils-new-cheaper-networking-option-cloud-customers-public-internet/

    Google Cloud Platform customers will have a new option when selecting the type of network used to deliver their traffic to their users: they can keep using Google’s network, or they can save some money with the new option of using public transit networks.

    Google has long argued that one of the best reasons to use its public cloud service is the strength of its fiber network, developed and enhanced for more than a decade to support the global data centers powering its search engine. But there are some applications that don’t require that level of performance, and so Google is now offering a cheaper networking service that uses the transit networks that deliver the bulk of traffic to internet service providers, said Prajakta Joshi, product manager for cloud networking at Google.

    Reply
  8. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Google Unveils a New, Cheaper Networking Option For Cloud Customers: the Public Internet
    https://tech.slashdot.org/story/17/08/23/1910252/google-unveils-a-new-cheaper-networking-option-for-cloud-customers-the-public-internet?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Slashdot%2Fslashdot%2Fto+%28%28Title%29Slashdot+%28rdf%29%29

    Google has long argued that one of the best reasons to use its public cloud service is the strength of its fiber network, developed and enhanced for more than a decade to support the global data centers powering its search engine. But there are some applications that don’t require that level of performance, and so Google is now offering a cheaper networking service — costing between 24 percent to 33 percent less — that uses the transit networks that deliver the bulk of traffic to internet service providers,

    Google unveils a new, cheaper networking option for cloud customers: the public internet
    https://www.geekwire.com/2017/google-unveils-new-cheaper-networking-option-cloud-customers-public-internet/

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*