AI hype has peaked so what’s next? | TechCrunch

https://techcrunch.com/2017/09/30/ai-hype-has-peaked-so-whats-next/?ncid=rss&utm_source=tcfbpage&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29&utm_content=FaceBook&sr_share=facebook

Year 2017 has been the year of AI, reaching a fever pitch of VC and corporate investment. But, as with any hot technology, AI is outgrowing this phase of experimentation and hype. According to research firm Gartner, we’re past the “peak of inflated expectations.” 

Next up is a necessary recalibration of the space—one that will separate the winning AI-driven companies from all the noise. Facebook, Google, and Amazon are innovating in AI at a rapid pace—displacing smaller competition by releasing new products or open sourcing more AI tools. 

6 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    10 Best Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning tools (ML) for you
    http://knowstartup.com/2017/09/10-best-ai-machine-learning-tools/

    Artificial Intelligence is radically changing the way we think of technology. It is progressing rapidly, with key advancements ranging from virtual assistants (such as Apple’s Siri and Microsoft Cortana) to fraud detection. This emerging tech now plays a part in everyday life.

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    James Somers / MIT Technology Review:
    Inside the history and limitations of Geoffrey Hinton’s 30-year-old backpropagation neural network technique, which formed the basis for modern deep learning — Just about every AI advance you’ve heard of depends on a breakthrough that’s three decades old.

    Is AI Riding a One-Trick Pony?
    https://www.technologyreview.com/s/608911/is-ai-riding-a-one-trick-pony/

    Just about every AI advance you’ve heard of depends on a breakthrough that’s three decades old. Keeping up the pace of progress will require confronting AI’s serious limitations.

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Bloomberg:
    CEO of $96B hedge fund Man Group reflects on the rise of AI-centric funds at the firm after being initially wary of incorporating AI into company’s strategy

    The Massive Hedge Fund Betting on AI
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-09-27/the-massive-hedge-fund-betting-on-ai

    Initially wary of the technology, Man Group was soon persuaded by the returns from algorithm-centric funds.

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    The Seven Deadly Sins of AI Predictions
    https://www.technologyreview.com/s/609048/the-seven-deadly-sins-of-ai-predictions/

    Mistaken extrapolations, limited imagination, and other common mistakes that distract us from thinking more productively about the future.

    Reply
  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Cade Metz / New York Times:
    Sources: typical AI specialists receiving $300K-$500K a year in salary and stock; well-known names in the AI field have received compensation totalling millions — Nearly all big tech companies have an artificial intelligence project, and they are willing to pay experts millions of dollars to help get it done.

    Tech Giants Are Paying Huge
    Salaries for Scarce A.I. Talent
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/22/technology/artificial-intelligence-experts-salaries.html

    Nearly all big tech companies have an artificial
    intelligence project, and they are willing to pay
    experts millions of dollars to help get it done.

    Reply
  6. Tomi Engdahl says:

    AI Is Creating Jobs, Not Destroying Them, Studies Find
    AI is feared to destroy jobs. But new studies are pointing to it doing the opposite.
    https://www.designnews.com/automation-motion-control/ai-creating-jobs-not-destroying-them-studies-find/198253024057690?ADTRK=UBM&elq_mid=1696&elq_cid=876648

    “Artificial intelligence is coming for your job.” That’s been the mantra of skeptics, naysayers, and even pragmatic analysts for years. A quick Google search will yield dozens, if not hundreds, of articles, such as this Mother Jones article by columnist Kevin Drum, on how the expansion of AI and robotics is going to radically shift the job market for the worse as we offload tasks, such as assembly and even driving and customer service, normally performed by humans to machines.

    Reply

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