IoT project links 2019

Internet is full of intetesting IoT projects built using Arduino, Raspberry Pi, ESP8266, ESP32, and many other hardware platforms. I will collect links to intetesting IoT projects to comments.

Feel free to post your best IoT project links to comments…

22 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    This Hack Lets You Use Alexa IoT Devices with Google Assistant
    https://blog.hackster.io/this-hack-lets-you-use-alexa-iot-devices-with-google-assistant-e78ef62576f3

    The Internet of Things (IoT) has a ton of potential, and the market has clearly shown that people absolutely want the convenience of home automation. The problem is a frustrating ecosystem of competing standards

    Many IoT devices only work with one assistant, such as Amazon Alexa or Google Assistant. Blake W. Ford’s hack gets around that and lets you use Alexa devices with your Google Assistant.

    Non-IFTTT Google Assistant Hacking
    Google Assist anything by hacking the TP-Link HS105
    https://hackaday.io/project/163011-non-ifttt-google-assistant-hacking

    Google Assistant technology is largely based on a partner device model where 3rd party providers manage back-end connections to their unique smart devices. While eventually the process is as simple as saying “Ok, Google. Turn on -”, setup always includes a non-Google vendor login and a special step to allow Google as an Authorized user on that account.

    I am working to rectify this. Specifically for devices where no partner agreement or account login exists but Google Home integration is desired.

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Build A Home Automation Hub For $20
    https://hackaday.com/2019/01/05/build-a-home-automation-hub-for-20/

    With so many WiFi home automation devices on the market, you might want to take advantage of these low cost products without having to send your data to third-party servers. This can be accomplished by running your own home automation hub on your home network.

    If you don’t want to use a full computer for this purpose, [Albert] has you covered. He recently wrote a guide on running Domoticz on the $20 GL-MT300Nv2 pocket router.

    20$ Pocket router as Domoticz Home Automation Gateway
    http://albert-david.blogspot.com/2019/01/20-pocket-router-as-domoticz-home.html

    I built a openwrt based custom firmware(autom8box), that packs router_functionality+domoticz_server+mqtt_broker which is all-in-one home-automation-gateway-solution running on a cheap $20 router that can be purchased off-the-shelf.

    Wifi based home automation products are cheaper compared to zigbee or z-wave products, but the downside is, wifi devices need internet connection to perform their function. Letting your home devices controlled by a bunch of cloud servers on the internet may not be the best idea.

    Internet connectivity for home devices should be optional – user should be incharge of deciding whether he/she wants to expose the home-devices to internet(may be for remote monitoring/controlling purpose), but in today’s world, there are so called “alexa”/”google-home” compliant wifi devices who insist on internet else they wont work.

    Thanks to the opensource community(tasmota/espurna/etc) for helping us to jailbreak those wifi devices like sonoff/blitzwolf/teckin/etc.. but jailbreaking solves part of the problem, still the need for a home-automation gateway is a challenge and requires some advanced knowledge of setting-up wifi_access_point + mqtt_broker + automation_gateway_server(ex: domoticz/openHab).

    ff-the-shelf cheap wifi-router into a full-automation-gateway to support following functionalities.

    wifi-access-point
    dhcp and dns server
    mqtt broker(mosquitto)
    domoticz

    GL-MT300Nv2 is a ~$20 device which supports opensource firmware like openwrt. All I did was to build my own variant of openwrt firmware that includes all necessary components like domoticz and mqtt-broker.

    Downside of using this device as an automation-gateway is the limited-wifi-range and limited set of domoticz plugins(because of 16MB flash limit).

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Add Electronic Interactivity to an IKEA LUSTIGT Spinning Prize Wheel
    https://blog.hackster.io/add-electronic-interactivity-to-an-ikea-lustigt-spinning-prize-wheel-b5f5a991cd3c

    While the LUSTIGT is purely mechanical, you can upgrade it to include electronic interactivity by following Baptiste Adrien’s Wonder Wheel guide.

    https://github.com/premieroctet/wonder-wheel/blob/master/README.md

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Building My Own Smart Central Heating Control System with a Sonoff TH16
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUI377TDgqo

    In this video I build my own smart central heating control system based around a Sonoff TH16 with my own custom software built mostly in Python deployed through Docker. The reason for this project was that I wanted a smart central heating system but didn’t want it to rely on any sort of manufacturer provided cloud service.

    Source Code (Very much still in development): https://github.com/Home-Automation-Hub

    Reply
  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Localize Your Board with an SMS
    https://www.hackster.io/Arduino_Genuino/localize-your-board-with-an-sms-38e331

    Get the position of your MKR GSM 1400 on your smartphone through an SMS with a Google Maps link.

    we implemented a simple application that allows you to retry the latitude and longitude of the MKR GSM when an SMS with a security check letter is received. The sender number is recovered from the SMS received and a reply is created with the proper Google Maps link completed by the coordinates given by the location services provided by the u-blox module.

    Reply
  6. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Monitor radioactivity levels with this low-cost Geiger counter
    https://blog.arduino.cc/2019/01/09/monitor-radioactivity-levels-with-this-low-cost-geiger-counter/

    DIY Radioactivity Counter (IoT) and Monitoring Eco-system
    https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Radioactivity-Counter-IoT-and-Eco-system/

    This D.I.Y low cost (50$/43€) C-GM Counter project provides hardware and firmware for building a Geiger-Müller counter device aka G.M. counter for continuous measurement of the radioactivity level. It is based on an Arduino Nano, a 20 chars x 4 lines LCD display, a W5100 Ethernet card, a 400V power supply and very few components around.

    Reply
  7. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Arduino – Control Step Motor Precisely via Web
    https://www.hackster.io/iot_lover/arduino-control-step-motor-precisely-via-web-e35e47

    Controlling a step motor by rotating a plate on web.

    When user access webpage of PHPoC [WiFi] Shield from a web browser on smartphone or PC, a WebSocket connection will be created between Arduino and web browser. The WebSocket connection allows for the real-time exchange data between web browser and Arduino without reloading webpage.

    Reply
  8. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Arduino – Control Step Motor Precisely via Web © GPL3+
    https://create.arduino.cc/projecthub/iot_lover/arduino-control-step-motor-precisely-via-web-e35e47

    Controlling a step motor by rotating a plate on web.

    When user access webpage of PHPoC [WiFi] Shield from a web browser on smartphone or PC, a WebSocket connection will be created between Arduino and web browser. The WebSocket connection allows for the real-time exchange data between web browser and Arduino without reloading webpage.

    Reply
  9. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Power and Connectivity Alarm
    https://www.hackster.io/stepanb/power-and-connectivity-alarm-33dc41

    In many areas you need to know if electric power or internet connectivity is available. This device sends message when you lost it.

    SigFox

    Reply
  10. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Connecting an Arduino MKR WiFi 1010 to AWS IoT Core
    https://www.hackster.io/Arduino_Genuino/securely-connecting-an-arduino-mkr-wifi-1010-to-aws-iot-core-a9f365

    In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to connect your Arduino MKR WiFi 1010 (or MKR 1000) board securely to AWS IoT Core.

    Reply
  11. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Securely Connecting an Arduino MKR WiFi 1010 to AWS IoT Core © CC BY
    https://create.arduino.cc/projecthub/Arduino_Genuino/securely-connecting-an-arduino-mkr-wifi-1010-to-aws-iot-core-a9f365

    In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to connect your Arduino MKR WiFi 1010 (or MKR 1000) board securely to AWS IoT Core.

    Reply
  12. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Particle Paves Way For LTE Selfies
    https://hackaday.com/2019/01/15/particle-paves-way-for-lte-selfies/

    From cars to refrigerators, it seems as if every new piece of tech is connected to the Internet. For better or for worse, we’re deep into the “Internet of Things”. But what about your camera? No, not the camera in your smartphone; that one’s already connected to the Internet and selling your secrets to the highest bidder. Don’t you think your trusty DSLR could be improved by an infusion of Wide Area Networking?

    https://github.com/timmah1991/CameraController

    Reply
  13. Tomi Engdahl says:

    WiFi Remote Control Those Cheap LED Strips with an ESP8266 Passthrough
    https://hackaday.com/2019/01/09/wifi-remote-control-those-cheap-led-strips/

    Reply
  14. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Win Back Some Privacy With A Cone Of Silence For Your Smart Speaker
    https://hackaday.com/2019/01/17/win-back-some-privacy-with-a-cone-of-silence-for-your-smart-speaker/

    To quote the greatest philosopher of the 20th century: “The future ain’t what it used to be.” Take personal assistants such as Amazon Echo and Google Home. When first predicted by sci-fi writers, the idea of instant access to the sum total of human knowledge with a few utterances seemed like a no-brainer; who wouldn’t want that? But now that such things are a reality, having something listening to you all the time and potentially reporting everything it hears back to some faceless corporate monolith is unnerving, to say the least.

    There’s a fix for that, though, with this cone of silence for your smart speaker. Dubbed “Project Alias” by [BjørnKarmann], the device consists of a Raspberry Pi with a couple of microphones and speakers inside a 3D-printed case. The Pi is programmed to emit white noise from its speakers directly into the microphones of the Echo or Home over which it sits, masking out the sounds in the room while simultaneously listening for a hot-word. It then mutes the white noise, plays a clip of either “Hey Google” or “Alexa” to wake the device up, and then business proceeds as usual.

    https://www.instructables.com/id/Project-Alias/

    Reply

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