Linux

​Linux totally dominates supercomputers | ZDNet

http://www.zdnet.com/article/linux-totally-dominates-supercomputers/  “All 500 of the world’s fastest supercomputers are running Linux” Linux rules supercomputing. This day has been coming since 1998. Before Linux took the lead, Unix was supercomputing’s top operating system. Now it seems that it will take a hardware revolution, such as quantum computing, to shake Linux’s supercomputing grip.  To this day, the Beowulf design remains

Arduino Blog » Linux support comes to Arduino Create

https://blog.arduino.cc/2017/11/03/linux-support-comes-to-arduino-create/ This looks interesting:  update to the Arduino Create web platform will enable development and deployment of IoT applications with integrated cloud services on Linux-based devices.  Users will be able to program their Linux boards as if they were regular Arduinos. Multiple Arduino programs can run simultaneously on a Linux board and programs can communicate

An introduction to timekeeping in Linux VMs | Opensource.com

https://opensource.com/article/17/6/timekeeping-linux-vms?sc_cid=7016000000127ECAAY Keeping time in Linux is not simple, and virtualization adds additional challenges and opportunities. This article reviews KVM, Xen, and Hyper-V related time-keeping techniques and the corresponding parts of the Linux kernel.

Do we really need swap on modern systems?

https://www.redhat.com/en/blog/do-we-really-need-swap-modern-systems  Swap is used to give processes room, even when the physical RAM of the system is already used up. In the past, some application vendors recommended swap of a size equal to the RAM, or even twice the RAM. Once the physical memory is used up, swap gets used. As the swap disk is much slower

Managing devices in Linux

https://opensource.com/article/16/11/managing-devices-linux?sc_cid=7016000000127ECAAY  There are many interesting features of the Linux directory structure. This article covers some fascinating aspects of the /dev directory.  Device files are also known as device special files. Device files are employed to provide the operating system and users an interface to the devices that they represent. All Linux device files are located in the

Tuning for Zero Packet Loss in Red Hat OpenStack Platform

http://redhatstackblog.redhat.com/2017/07/11/tuning-for-zero-packet-loss-in-red-hat-openstack-platform-part-1/?sc_cid=7016000000127ECAAY For Telcos considering OpenStack, one of the major areas of focus can be around network performance. While the performance discussion may often begin with talk of throughput numbers expressed in Million-packets-per-second (Mpps) values across Gigabit-per-second (Gbps) hardware, it really is only the tip of the performance iceberg. The most common requirement is to have

Examining network connections on Linux systems | Network World

https://www.networkworld.com/article/3230519/linux/examining-network-connections-on-linux-systems.html Linux systems provide a lot of useful commands for reviewing network configuration and connections. Here’s a look at a few, including ifquery, ifup, ifdown and ifconfig. You might now most of them, but most propably not all of them… so check out to learn the rest.

Android users rejoice! Linux kernel LTS releases are now good for 6 years | Ars Technica

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/09/android-users-rejoice-linux-kernel-lts-releases-are-now-good-for-6-years/ The free and open source Linux kernel powers most of the devices around us. It’s not only present in computers and servers, in Android devices, the Internet of things, and almost anything else you can call “smart.” A major change in the maintenance lifecycle of Linux kernels is coming for good. During a Linaro

Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux | Linux.com

https://www.linux.com/learn/intro-to-linux/2017/9/security-tools-check-viruses-and-malware-linux Wait, Linux needs antivirus and anti-malware solutions? I thought it was immune to such things. Perhaps a bit of clarification is necessary here. First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack.  Whether you need an antivirus or anti-malware scanner or a tool to hunt for rootkits, Linux has you covered.