How the Boeing 737 Max Disaster Looks to a Software Developer – IEEE Spectrum

https://spectrum.ieee.org/aerospace/aviation/how-the-boeing-737-max-disaster-looks-to-a-software-developer
The Boeing 737 Max has been in the news because of two crashes, practically back to back and involving brand new airplanes.
“Everything about the design and manufacture of the Max was done to preserve the myth that ‘it’s just a 737.’ Recertifying it as a new aircraft would have taken years and millions of dollars. In fact, the pilot licensed to fly the 737 in 1967 is still licensed to fly all subsequent versions of the 737.”

But some things clearly went wrong on the design process. This article tries to find out what went wrong.

151 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Pilot Shows Off Entire Server Room That Exists In Passenger Aircraft Right Below Our Feet
    https://www.iflscience.com/technology/pilot-shows-off-entire-server-room-that-exists-in-passenger-aircraft-right-below-our-feet/

    Modern passenger jets are highly computerized, with advances in technology constantly improving safety and efficiency. Between the plethora of measuring systems and the intelligent autopilot that does most of the flying on an average overseas long haul, it should come as no surprise that airliners are packing some serious computational power under the hood.

    In a video posted by a popular YouTuber and passenger jet pilot, bjornpilot shows off an entire room of server racks within the Airbus A350, one of the more modern airliners in user today. To the uninitiated, the so-called avionics compartment looks like it could be mining some serious cryptocurrency or powering an AI platform, but instead the entire system is there to keep the 319-ton A350 off the ground.

    https://youtu.be/241-5DZyons

    Reply

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