Networking trends 2019

5G? IoT? Fiber Deep? 600G? We Are ready for networking at 2019!
For years we have all been talking about the emergence of 5G services, the Internet of Things (IoT) and the new high-capacity, low-latency network architectures that will be needed to support the resulting onslaught of bandwidth. Higher-speed data rates are critical to electronic evolution and revolution.

Here are some of my collection of newest trends and predictions for year 2018.  have picked and mixed here quotations from many articles (linked to source) with some of my own additions to make this posting.

5G: The most newsworthy stories in wireless today are all about 5G. In 2019, we enter a cautious, early-adoption phase of this next generation of wireless technology. 2019 will be the year when we see the first commercial networks turning on and first handsets arriving in the market. Only a small number of users will get a first taste of 5G in specific geographic locations, using specific applications, none of which are ubiquitous or cost-optimized. For more details read my 5G trends for 2019 posting.


Deep fiber: Deep deployment of fiber optics into national network infrastructure might not be as glamorous as the eagerly anticipated launch of fifth-generation mobile networks (5G); however, it is just as important—maybe even more important. Wired broadband access supports as much as 90 percent of all internet traffic even though the majority of traffic ultimately terminates on a wireless device. Wireline and wireless networks are driving new architectures to support the move from 4G LTE to 5G infrastructure. In fact, 5G relies heavily on fiber infrastructure. Service providers in the access market are talking about the evolution of their plants to a Fiber Deep (FD) Architecture. FD architectures move the optical node (the optical-to-electrical conversion point) deeper into the network and closer to the subscriber. This means shorter copper, faster speed, more capacity and reduction in maintenance cost for both cable TV network and telephone line based access networks.

Ethernet: Faster Ethernet speeds are taken to use. These transitions are driven by the increasing global IP traffic. Hyper-scalers and service providers are moving from 100GbE to 400GbE Ethernet rates and beyond. In this speed development 56Gb/s And 112Gb/s SerDes Matter.

TSN: Time-Sensitive Networking (TSN) is a set of standards under development by the Time-Sensitive Networking task group of the IEEE 802.1 working group. TSN standards documents that are specified by IEEE 802.1 can be grouped into three basic key component categories that are time synchronization; scheduling and traffic shaping; selection of communication paths, path reservations and fault-tolerance. Industrial Ethernet networks embrace time-sensitive networking (TSN) technology to integrate operational technology (OT) and information technology (IT).

SDN: Software-defined networking (SDN) technology is an approach to cloud computing that facilitates network management and enables programmatically efficient network configuration in order to improve network performance and monitoring. SD-WAN applies similar technology to a wide area network (WAN). SD-WAN allows companies to build higher-performance WANs using lower-cost and commercially available Internet access, enabling businesses to partially or wholly replace more expensive private WAN connection technologies such as MPLS.

IPv6: IPv4 and IPv6 are the two Protocols Run the Internet in 2019. The long-forecasted day the internet runs out of addresses has arrived and it marks a paradigm shift in the internet’s evolution. Though IPv6 has been available globally since 2012, it has seen a slow, if increasing, adoption rate. The migration to IPv6 is inevitable but will take time during that both systems are in use. In many networks a notable amount of traffic is already IPv6.
New Internet protocols: Internet security gets a boost with TLS 1.3. Also HTTP is in process of switching to a protocol layered on top of UDP. Today’s HTTP (versions 1.0, 1.1, and 2) are all layered on top of TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) that is not very optimal in today’s applications as SSL over TCP requires subsequent round trips to establish the encrypted connection.

IoT: The IoT world is here, and the level and rate of convergence is increasing in volume and velocity. We will see the evolution of converged networks for IoT applications in mind. Network convergence (version 2.0) is here with changes and improvements made since the first converged network (Convergence 1.0). TIA TR-42 (Telecommunications Cabling Systems ANSI/TIA-568 family), BICSI (TDMM and others) and proprietary or third documents must adapt and adjust.

PoE: The IEEE 802.3bt standard, approved by the IEEE Standards Association Board on September 27, 2018, included some significant enhancements especially for LED lighting systems. This specification allows for up to 90W of delivered power for cable lengths of up to 100m through the use of all four pairs of wires.

Edge data centers: The decentralization of the cloud and data centers are happening. Hundreds of scaled-down micro data centers are appearing at the edge of the network to support latency-sensitive IoT devices, real-time safety systems and now self- driven cars.

Trade wars: It seem that there is a high tech “trade war” between USA and China. It affects specifically networking business. Big Chinese manufacturers Huawei and ZTE are have received sanctions and their products are not wanted by many countries citing  their business practices and potential security nightmares. For example Japan to halt buying Huawei, ZTE equipment and Huawei has been under fire in UK, just to mention examples. It seems that the business that is lost by Huawei and ZTE could benefit Ericsson and Nokia in the 5G base station markets for short term.

Security: The internet is going to hell and its creators want your help fixing it. All agree on one thing however: Right now there is a serious battle for heart and minds, the future of the internet and global society itself. There seems to be need for a conference to address the fact that people increasingly see tech as a threat and no longer as a pure force for good. Government set to revise internal rules on procurement to protect national cybersecurity. Your DNS might be broken, and you don’t even know it. Some DNS old hacks gets thrown out of use by February 1st, 2019.
WiFi: WiFi technology gets new marketing naming. The numerical sequence includes:  Wi-Fi 6 to identify devices that support 802.11ax technology, Wi-Fi 5 to identify devices that support 802.11ac technology, Wi-Fi 4 to identify devices that support 802.11n technology.

Faster mobile: Mobile networks are getting faster in many countries. Mobile networks are killing Wi-Fi for speed around the world. Average data speeds on mobile networks now outpace customer’s Wi-Fi connection, on average, in 33 countries. That’s the The State of Wifi vs Mobile Network Experience as 5G Arrives.

Energy efficiency: We need to develop more energy efficient networking technologies. Today, information and communication technologies globally consume 8% of electricity and doubles every year.

 

763 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Fiber optic ethernet connections
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ccvw2jkT8H0

    We invite You to watch our video tutorial on creating fiber optic ethernet connections.

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Eriq Gardner / The Hollywood Reporter:
    Netflix will benefit from Biden’s EO as net neutrality resurfaces and competitors’ mergers face scrutiny, such as the Amazon-MGM and WarnerMedia-Discovery deals — The streaming giant should welcome — even celebrate — the White House’s efforts to promote competition. Why? Look closely.

    Netflix Quietly a Huge Winner in Biden’s Order Targeting Big Business
    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/business/business-news/netflix-joe-biden-1234979790/

    The streaming giant should welcome — even celebrate — the White House’s efforts to promote competition. Why? Look closely.

    Now comes news that Biden is taking aim at non-competes. It remains to be seen if the FTC really is empowered to bar the types of contractual provisions that impede workers from switching jobs, but the development still amounts to wind behind Netflix’s sails. Plus, who knows? As Netflix continues to aggressively grow itself through recruitment, perhaps Netflix will have better luck with Biden-era federal agencies than it’s had with California courts.

    Still not convinced that the Biden order is very Netflix-friendly?

    Well, consider how Biden is urging the FCC to reinstate Obama-era net neutrality rules. Remember this used to be a huge policy priority for the bandwidth hog that is Netflix, and while the streamer has been a lot less vocal in recent years at the prospect of telecoms throttling its traffic, it surely still sees the development as a positive. Plus, should Biden eventually get around to nominating a third FCC commissioner, there’s always the possibility that the independent agency enacts net neutrality rules that favor Netflix by being even tougher than the set that came before. For instance, banning interconnection charges or stopping telecom data providers like AT&T and Comcast from “zero rating” owned content.

    To be sure, not everything in Biden’s order will be advantageous to Netflix. For instance, the White House is encouraging the FTC to establish rules on data surveillance. The streamer, which famously collects a lot of data from users and has been a pioneer on the algorithmic programming front, will need to carefully navigate any future regulations on ensuring the privacy and visibility of data.

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Magneto Era (1876-1900)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLCnbgCbto4

    In his wildest dreams thay NEVER thought of watching this on a telephone

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Japan Has Shattered the Internet Speed Record at 319 Terabits per Second
    https://interestingengineering.com/japan-shattered-internet-speed-record-319-terabits?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Article&utm_campaign=organic&utm_content=Jul14

    Engineers in Japan just shattered the world record for the fastest internet speed, achieving a data transmission rate of 319 Terabits per second (Tb/s), according to a paper presented at the International Conference on Optical Fiber Communications in June. The new record was made on a line of fibers more than 1,864 miles (3,000 km) long. And, crucially, it is compatible with modern-day cable infrastructure.

    The new data transfer method breaks signals up into various wavelengths

    Note well: we can’t stress enough how fast this transmission speed is. It’s nearly double the previous record of 178 Tb/s, which was set in 2020. And it’s seven times the speed of the earlier record of 44.2 Tb/s, set with an experimental photonic chip. NASA itself uses a comparatively primitive speed of 400 Gb/s, and the new record soars impossibly high above what ordinary consumers can use (the fastest of which maxes out at 10 Gb/s for home internet connections).

    The new system begins its transmission process with a 552-channel comb laser fired at various wavelengths. This is then sent through dual polarization modulation, such that some wavelengths go before others, to generate multiple signal sequences — each of which is in turn directed into one of the four cores within the optical fiber. Data transmitted via this system moves through 43.5 miles (70 km) of optical fiber, until it hits optical amplifiers to boost the signal for its long journey. But there’s even more complexity: The signal runs through two novel kinds of fiber amplifiers, one doped in thulium, the other in erbium, before it continues on its way, in a conventional process called Raman amplification.

    After this, signal sequences are sent into another segment of optical fiber, and then the entire process repeats, enabling the researchers to send data over a staggering distance of 1,864.7 miles (3,001 km). Crucially, the novel four-core optical fiber possesses the same diameter as a conventional single-core fiber, bracketing the protective cladding around it. In other words, integrating the new method into existing infrastructure will be far simpler than other technological overhauls to societal information systems.

    Reply
  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Japan breaks internet speed record with a 319Tbps data transfer
    The new fiber could help satisfy demand for 6G and beyond.
    https://www.engadget.com/japan-breaks-internet-speed-record-200136933.html

    The many-gigabit internet speed records of a decade ago now seem downright inadequate. Motherboard reports that scientists at Japan’s National institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) have smashed the internet transfer record by shuffling data at 319Tbps. For context, that’s almost twice as fast as the 179Tbps a team of British and Japanese researchers managed in August 2020.

    NICT managed the feat by upgrading virtually every stage of the pipeline. The fiber optic line had four cores instead of one, and researchers fired a 552-channel comb laser at multiple wavelengths with the assistance of rare earth amplifiers. While the test was strictly confined to the lab, the team used coiled fiber to transfer data at a simulated 1,864-mile distance without losing signal quality or speed.

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*