IoT trends 2019

IoT is already completely entrenched in our society across end-market segments, but there are still enormous challenges around the design, development, and deployment of devices and services for the IoT, with security at the top of the list in 2019.

Here are some IoT trends for year 2019 to watch:

More device: There are four times as many devices connected to the Internet as there are people in the world, and the number of devices is increasing rapidly. There are computers, smart phones and many different kind of connected devices. Gartner forecasts that 14.2 billion connected things will be in use in 2019, and that the total will reach 25 billion by 2021,

Voice: The integration of voice into IoT devices creates an user experience that many consumers seem to enjoy. The next few years will see voice automation take over many aspects of our lives. The current major players in the IoT voice world are Amazon’s Alexa, Apple’s Siri,  and Google Assistant. Microsoft’s Cortana seems to have already lost in the game as Satya Nadella says Cortana won’t challenge Alexa and Google Assistant directly; Microsoft will focus on making it a skill on other voice platforms instead. Voice won’t change everything but it will be one part of a movement that heralds a new way to think about our relationship with devices and data. Consider voice as a type of user interface to be added to the existing list of UI technologies. Voice will not kill brands, it won’t hurt keyboard sales or touchscreen devices — it will become an additional way to do stuff; it is incremental. We need to learn to design around it.Deloitte expects the sales of 164 million smart speakers at an average price of $43 in 2019. The smart speaker market will be worth more than $7 billion next year, increasing 63% from 2018’s $4.3 billion.

Automobiles: Automobiles are leading the way in IoT adoption. Gartner predicts that one in five cars will be connected by 2020. Both Google and Apple have tools that allow drivers to control calls, listen to messages and control apps using voice.

IoT clouds: Developing for the Internet of Things is a complex endeavor, and nobody wants to do it from scratch. IoT data platforms offer a jumping-off point by combining many of the tools needed to manage a deployment from device management to data prediction and insights into one service. There are many IoT cloud platforms to choose from.  All cloud platforms have their own distinctive areas of pros and cons. Ultimately the project needs and cost-effectiveness determine whom to choose. Utilizing cloud services also brings new potential risks that are good to understand already at the beginning of the project. I wrote on article to Uusiteknologia.fi magazine issue 2/2018 on IoT cloud platforms.

Digital Twins: Digital twin tech, or a virtual representation of a product, is a critical concept in IoT that’s still being sorted out. Digital twin refers to a digital replica of physical assets (physical twin), processes, people, places, systems and devices that can be used for various purposes. Definitions of digital twin technology emphasize two important characteristics: connection from the physical model to the corresponding virtual model and this connection is established by generating real time data using sensors. Physical objects and twin models interact. Digital twins applications typically integrate internet of things, artificial intelligence, machine learning and software analytics with spatial network graphs to create living digital simulation models that update and change as their physical counterparts change. In various industrial sectors, twins are being used to optimize the operation and maintenance of physical assets, systems and manufacturing processes.

Edge computing: The shift from centralized and cloud to edge architectures is well under way in the IoT space. In the future, computing the edge of the network will become an increasingly important way of processing data from networked devices and sensor networksCompared to traditional centralized cloud computing, the new edge computing brings computing servers closer to the edge of the communications network. Compared to cloud centered IoT solutions, edge computing allow for lower delays and more reliable operation with respect to cloud services. At the same time, it promises improved security as not all potentially sensitive information needs to be transferred from the site to cloud. However, this is not the end point because the neat set of layers associated with edge architecture will evolve to a more unstructured architecture comprising of a wide range of “things” and services connected in a dynamic mesh. In thins kind of system data processing can be done on almost all network devices from IoT modules to gateways and in the future to 5G base stations.  Relevant standardizing organizations on this field are Edge Computing Consortium Europe, OpenFog Consortium and Industrial Internet Consortium.

5G: 5G networks start to arrive. The standards for 5G will be defined in large part by the direct integration of Internet of Things (IoT) and Industrial IoT (IIoT) devices into global networks and devices. 5G networks are expected to be 10 to 100 times faster than current LTE technology. If you are in need for very high speed, your application resides inside the small 5G test networks coverage areas and your IoT device is allowed to consume considerable amount of power (more than 4G solutions), then you might be able to consider 5G. For all other cases I don’t see 5G would offer much for IoT applications in 2019. There is not yet ready 5G standards specifically designed for IoT applications. So for 2019 IoT and IIoT will need to be pretty much stick to 4G technologies like NB-IoT and LTE-M. For 5G to shape industrial computing application in larger scale than just some small tests we will have to wait till 2020. Addressing the issues behind Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) devices and 5G is important in next few years. Qualcomm, the largest supplier of modem chips used in smartphones, has introduced the X50 modem to give IIoT devices the ability to communicate over 5G networks. Beware of “fake 5G” marketing in 2019. The promise is that 5G will enable the future enterprise technologies everyone is predicting and waiting for: fleets of self-driving delivery trucks, virtual (VR) and augmented reality (AR), and a world of enterprise Internet of Things (IoT) deployments — systems that will define an era that the World Economic Forum termed the “Fourth Industrial Revolution.”  Those promises will take years to realize, you will not see most of them in real use in 2019.

AI: Number one in Gartner’s predictions, no surprise, is artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence and machine learning will be talked a lot with bold claims that AI goes from expert-only to everywhere. I would not expect it to be everywhere in 2019. Gartner, said in a statement, “AI will be applied to a wide range of IoT information, including video, still images, speech, network traffic activity, and sensor data.” At the moment many neural network systems are power hungry when implemented with traditional computer hardware. “For example, the performance of deep neural networks (DNNs) is often limited by memory bandwidth, rather than processing power.” By 2023, it’s expected that new special-purpose chips will reduce the power consumption required to run a DNN, enabling new edge architectures and embedded DNN functions in low-power IoT endpoints.

IIoT: The concept of a Smart Factory is composed of many different physical and informational subsystems, such as actuators and sensors, control systems, product management systems and manufacturing systems that all work together.  This is a very complex system. It is critical to understand differing operational technology (OT) and information technology (IT) priorities to achieve collaboration and integration. Without this, Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and control projects will fail. Also finding the right Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) vendor partner is crucial to success. OPC Foundation has on initiative to extend OPC UA out to field devices to provide vendor-neutral, end-to-end interoperability beyond the plant. Time-Sensitive Networking (TSN) network works well for OPC UA applications.

Value chain: IoT as an umbrella term will diminish. There are strong views that “Internet of things is not valuable in and of itself” so the conversation is going to shift away from an ambiguous buzzword to the actual use of technology. For product designers this means that when we design our connected world, we need to pull ourselves away from the cool technology that we are building and look at the system through our customers’ eyes. The sales pitch will be more like “It’s about the use cases, it’s about the solutions, it’s about the applications, managing and monitoring assets, performance management solutions, different kinds of solutions coming together to solve a problem—that’s really what the value proposition is.”

IoT platforms: IoT vendors will compete to be the destination for IoT platforms. The IoT supply chain has been moving toward more collaboration to provide development and design kits designed for specific use cases and industries. IoT development kits are sold more and more with bundled IoT could service offer. IoT cloud service providers offer and recommend hardware that is tested to work well with their platforms. IoT platform vendors will be narrowing their scope in 2019, honing in on specific use cases. Business professionals aren’t looking for one industrial IoT platform to manage every process going on at their company, they are instead looking for platforms that specialize in specific tasks.

New development kits: A new breed of development kits is incorporating the three tenets of IoT design — ease of use, security, and business value. The promise is that the design engineers don’t need to have specialized expertise in several areas like networking protocols or security-related tasks, enabling a much faster development time. One way to simplifying design work is by intelligently reusing the fundamental building blocks.

Security: Wireless IoT devices are considered a major threat to the security of industrial networks. A growing number of embedded systems are open to security threats as a result of increasing connectivity and IoT device adoption. And it’s costing OEMs a lot in terms of money and reputation. A 2018 Gartner Inc. survey found that nearly 20% of organizations surveyed experienced at least one IoT-based attack in the past three years. IoT security is already a 1.5 billion dollar market. The market research firm Garnet expects that global spending on IoT security will rise to $3.1 billion in 2021, up from $1.5 billion in 2018. It is not about the spending on IoT security products. Already “a significant portion of OEMs’ existing in-house labor cost is already dedicated to addressing security” and is rising faster than development costs. VDC pegs the worldwide embedded engineering labor spend related to security at $11.6 billion in 2017, representing nearly 8% of the overall cost of embedded engineering labor. There will be different kind of certification marks for IoT product cyber security – some mandated with laws on some countries and some voluntary. 5G is going to increase security risks. Do we understand the 5G security threats to come? Most probably not because we don’t seem to understand well even that 5G really is.

eSIM: The embedded SIM card has been spoken for a long time, and even the first smartphones in which the SIM card has been implemented with an integrated circuit have already been introduced to the market. Infineon has presented the world’s first industrially qualified eSIM. Of course, eSIM shares opinions. Many operators do not like it.

Infonomics and Data Broking: Last year’s Gartner survey of IoT projects showed 35 percent of respondents were selling or planning to sell data collected by their products and services.“Data is the fuel that powers the IoT and the organization’s ability to derive meaning from it will define their long term success,” This brings us to Social, Legal and Ethical IoT because“ Successful deployment of an IoT solution demands that it’s not just technically effective but also socially acceptable,” It is possible tha tIoT Firms Face a ‘Tidal Wave’ of Lawsuits.

IoT Governance: As the IoT continues to expand, the need for a governance framework that ensures appropriate behavior in the creation, storage, use and deletion of information related to IoT projects will become increasingly important. We also need to manage IoT devices to keep them secure and make sure that they do what they are supposed to do. A market for IoT managed services will develop to help manage and operate fragmented IoT assets. “The idea of managing the ongoing end-to-end life cycle of a connected product is becoming more important, and ultimately this managed service opportunity is going to need momentum in the coming year,”

New Wireless Technologies: IoT networking involves balancing a set of competing requirements, such as endpoint cost, power consumption, bandwidth, latency, connection density, operating cost, quality of service, and range. No single networking technology optimizes all of these.

Trusted Hardware and Operating System: Gartner surveys invariably show that security is the most significant area of technical concern for organizations deploying IoT systems. Today organizations often don’t have control over the source and nature of the software and hardware being utilised in IoT initiatives. “However, by 2023, we expect to see the deployment of hardware and software combinations that together create more trustworthy and secure IoT systems.

Home automation: Arm predicts that the intelligent home goes mainstream. In survey results they published two-thirds of respondents said technology became “more a part of my life” during 2018. Cisco Systems is saying connected homes will be a big driver for the Internet of Things. “Connected home applications, such as home automation, home security and video surveillance, connected white goods, and tracking applications, will represent 48%, or nearly half, of the total M2M connections by 2022, showing the pervasiveness of M2M in our lives,” Cisco states in its new white paper, Visual Networking Index: Forecast and Trends, 2017-2022. The market is starting slowly. Bundled IoT services will try to motivate a slow consumer market.

Smart cities: Cities are becoming smarter and smarter in an effort to improve efficiency in operations. Smart cities bring in both benefits and risks. Between smart lighting, traffic controls, and public transportation, smart cities are bringing in a whole new family of threat vectors. Cybercriminals will target smart cities with ransomware attacks. Smart cities need to take precautions.

Silicon Chip Innovation: “Currently, most IoT endpoint devices use conventional processor chips, with low-power ARM architectures being particularly popular. However, traditional instruction sets and memory architectures aren’t well-suited to all the tasks that endpoints need to perform,” New special-purpose chips will reduce the power consumption required to run a DNN. Very low power circuit designs are important in many applications. Battery-powered designs require complex optimizations for power in the context of area, performance and functionality. Devices that work without battery and gather operating power from environment are maybe even more challenging. Clearly, sensors are a big part of any connected device, and there is a lot of innovation occurring in this market that delivers new features — think AI — all housed in smaller packaging.

Open source: 2019 Will Be the Year of Open Source in IoT and embedded systems applications. From software and even hardware, we saw more activity in open source than ever before in 2018. And the momentum isn’t likely to slow down in 2019. Arduino is pushing strongly to IoT markets with MKR1000 series of IoT boards. Raspberry Pi is very widely used in IoT systems, especially on prototyping and small scale deployments

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Links to other articles for IoT trends for 2019:

Internet of Things in 2019: Five predictions

Kymmenen tulevaisuuden kuluttajatrendiä ja ilmiötä

Deloitte’s 9 tech predictions for 2019

New Chip Architectures, Sensors and Trust in Top 10 IoT Trends (Gartner presented its top 10 strategic IoT technology trends)

Week In Review: IoT, Security, Auto (predictions from Arm, Deloitte and Juniper Research)

Predictions 2019: The Internet Of Things

Gartner Identifies Top 10 Strategic IoT Technologies and Trends

 

521 Comments

  1. Tomi Engdahl says:

    MicroEJ is taking over IoT on Earth and beyond
    https://techcrunch.com/2020/01/14/microej-is-taking-over-iot-on-earth-and-beyond/

    MicroEJ CEO Fred Rivard took me through his company’s history from its founding in 2004 until now. Much of those earlier years were spent in development, but since around 2012 or so, the French company has been deploying for IoT devices what Android is to smartphones — a flexible, extensible platform that can operate on a wide range of hardware profiles while being relatively easy to target for application and feature developers. MicroEJ takes the ‘code once, deploy anywhere’ maxim to the extreme, since its platform is designed from the ground up to be incredibly conservative when it comes to resource consumption, meaning it can run on hardware with as little as one-tenth or more the bill of materials cost of running more complex operating platforms — like Android Things, for instance.

    “We take category of device where currently, Android is too big,”

    Reply
  2. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Industry 4.0 Week: These Israeli Startups Revolutionize Manufacturing By Cutting Operational Inefficiency
    https://blog.startupnationcentral.org/industry_4/industry40-iiot-israeli-startups-manufacturing/

    Reply
  3. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Sorry, Alexa and Siri. Only Google Home can do these 5 things
    https://www.cnet.com/how-to/sorry-alexa-and-siri-only-google-home-can-do-these-5-things/?UniqueID=B469E57A-3934-11EA-A230-B1ADC28169F1&ftag=COS-05-10aaa0a&PostType=link&TheTime=2020-01-17T14%3A21%3A51&ServiceType=facebook_page

    Google Assistant is smarter and more personable than other digital voice assistants. It even lets you call it Boo Boo.

    Reply
  4. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Apple, Amazon, And Google Want To Standardize Your Smart Home
    https://www.designnews.com/electronics-test/apple-amazon-and-google-want-standardize-your-smart-home/171002162962198?ADTRK=InformaMarkets&elq_mid=11892&elq_cid=876648

    The Zigbee Alliance has brought some big names to its Connected Home over IP (CHIP) working group. But can tech giants play nice for the sake of creating a standard protocol for smart home devices?

    The Zigbee Alliance recently announced that it has brought together some tech giants, including Apple, Amazon, and Google to form a new working group, the Connected Home over IP (or CHIP) project, to develop and promote a new, royalty-free and secure connectivity standard for smart home products.

    “The project is built around a shared belief that smart home devices should be secure, reliable, and seamless to use,” the Zigbee Allliance said in an official statement. “By building upon Internet Protocol (IP), the project aims to enable communication across smart home devices, mobile apps, and cloud services and to define a specific set of IP-based networking technologies for device certification.”

    The Zigbee Alliance, which includes companies such as NXP Semiconductors, Samsung SmartThings, Schneider Electric, and IKEA, believes that leveraging smart home products from Apple, Google, and Amazon – products based on Apple’s Siri, Google Assistant, and Amazon’s Alexa respectively – will accelerate the development of this new protocol and make it easier for third-party device manufacturers to create smart home products that are more universally accessible for consumers.

    For its part Apple has pledged to open source portions of HomeKit, its development kit for smart home devices. Developers can now use the HomeKit Open Source Accessory Development Kit (ADK) to prototype non-commercial smart home accessories.

    In a blog post Google said it will be bringing technologies from its OpenWeave project as well as its expertise in IP-carrying, low-powered mesh networking protocols to the table. OpenWeave is an open-source implementation of the network application layer behind Google’s Nest line of products which include thermostats, cameras, doorbells, alarms, and locks.

    https://developers.googleblog.com/2019/12/project-connected-home-over-ip.html

    Reply
  5. Tomi Engdahl says:

    IoT businesses are notoriously difficult to get off the ground.

    Join Ubuntu Product Manger, Rhys Davies as he explains how you can get your product to market and establish the foundation for long term success.

    https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/6793/381350?utm_source=Facebook_ad&utm_medium=Social&utm_campaign=CY20_IOT_Brandstore_WBN_5Steps

    Reply
  6. Tomi Engdahl says:

    From Saving Lives to Leveraging IoT—This Smart Hospital Does It All
    https://www.electronicdesign.com/industrial-automation/article/21120958/from-saving-lives-to-leveraging-iotthis-smart-hospital-does-it-all?utm_source=EG+ED+IoT+for+Engineers&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CPS200117072&o_eid=7211D2691390C9R&rdx.ident%5Bpull%5D=omeda%7C7211D2691390C9R&oly_enc_id=7211D2691390C9R

    The availability of granular real-time data allows this hospital team to gauge how its energy reduction programs are performing, helping ensure that targets are met on time.

    Reply
  7. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Jean-Louis Gassée / Monday Note:
    Consumer IoT is in trouble because normal people can’t be expected to manage a house full of smart things or keep track of their bugs and looming obsolescence — The everything-computerized-and-always- connected smarthome is a work in progress. This slow pace is a good thing because it gives us …

    IoT Trouble: The Sonos Example — And More
    https://mondaynote.com/iot-trouble-the-sonos-example-and-more-ccd3ccb8645e?gi=7e67f43f318

    The everything-computerized-and-always-connected smarthome is a work in progress. This slow pace is a good thing because it gives us time to consider new technical and societal challenges.

    Reply
  8. Tomi Engdahl says:

    IoT security: Your smart devices must have these three features to be secure
    https://www.zdnet.com/article/iot-security-your-smart-devices-must-have-these-three-features-to-be-secure/

    Proposed laws from the UK for Internet of Things security mean vendors will need to follow new rules to be considered secure.

    Reply
  9. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Speeding Up IOTA Proof Of Work Using FPGAs
    https://hackaday.com/2019/11/16/speeding-up-iota-proof-of-work-using-fpgas/

    Blockchain has existed as a concept since the early 1990s, but keeping a distributed ledger for IoT transactions wasn’t widely implemented until IOTA developed Tangle. The blockchain company was initially founded as a hardware startup and pivoted to work on transactional settlement for IoT. The Tangle, their distributed ledger architecture based on a directed acyclic graph (DAG) works as a “blockchain without the blocks and the chain”.

    Reply
  10. Tomi Engdahl says:

    The Internet Of Football
    https://hackaday.com/2020/01/31/the-internet-of-football/

    But the last few years have seen the rise of data collection. It’s being driven by RFID tags in the player’s shoulder pads.

    These aren’t the RFID chips in your credit card. These are long-range devices and in the right stadium, a computer can track not only the player’s position, but also his speed, acceleration, and a host of other statistics.

    Reply
  11. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Another IoT Debacle: Charter Offers Home Insecurity
    https://hackaday.com/2020/01/18/another-iot-debacle-charter-offers-home-insecurity/

    If you are a glass-half-empty person, you’ll view Charter’s announcement that they will shutter their home security and smart home service on February 5th as another reason not to buy into closed-source IoT devices. If you are a glass-half-full person though, you’ll see the cable company’s announcement as a sign that a lot of Zigbee hardware will soon flood the surplus market. Ars Technica reports that after investigation it appears that some of the devices may connect to a standard Zigbee hub after a factory reset, but many others will definitely not.

    Smart homes will turn dumb overnight as Charter kills security service
    Charter’s product shutdown highlights lack of interoperability in alarm systems.
    https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2020/01/smart-homes-will-turn-dumb-overnight-as-charter-kills-security-service/

    Reply
  12. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Modified RFID Tags Add Wireless Wetness Notification to Adult, Infant Diapers for Just 2¢ Each
    https://www.hackster.io/news/modified-rfid-tags-add-wireless-wetness-notification-to-adult-infant-diapers-for-just-2-each-637c85d58c2f

    MIT and Michigan State University researchers have found a means to communicate wetness in a diaper wirelessly — without batteries.

    Reply
  13. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Low-cost “smart” diaper can notify caregiver when it’s wet
    Design combines a common diaper material with RFID technology.
    http://news.mit.edu/2020/smart-diaper-rfid-notify-caregiver-0214

    Reply
  14. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Tools for setting up a little Edge IoT system: Mosquitto, InfluxDB, Telegraf and Chronograf.

    You can get many features you get out of the box when you’re already collecting data with MQTT.

    Reply
  15. Tomi Engdahl says:

    Engineers Create Floating, Solar-Powered Water Quality Sensors with “Multi-Dimensional ICs”
    https://www.hackster.io/news/engineers-create-floating-solar-powered-water-quality-sensors-with-multi-dimensional-ics-decb8d775b71

    Taking the form of a cube, the floating sensors can track both water and air quality while drawing their power from solar cells.

    Reply
  16. Tomi Engdahl says:

    UC San Diego Engineers Design New Low-Power Wi-Fi Chip for IoT Devices
    https://www.hackster.io/news/uc-san-diego-engineers-design-new-low-power-wi-fi-chip-for-iot-devices-791762f26b27

    Smaller than a grain of rice, UCSD’s chip enables devices to communicate with networks using 5,000 less power than today’s Wi-Fi radios.

    Reply

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